Free Introductory Herbal Course!

 

Wow, just got an e-mail from Nick Polizzi at Sacred Science about this free course some of you may want to sign up for. I know I just did a post yesterday, but registration for this ends today, so thought I would do a quick post so you don’t miss out. Here’s what Nick had to say…..

 

If you’d like to learn how to create your own herbal remedies, I have the perfect resource in mind!

Our friends at The Herbal Academy just recently released a FREE online Introductory Herbal Course! I can safely say that this is one of the most high quality herbal education platforms I’ve ever experienced. The women who run Herbal Academy are dedicated, passionate and extremely knowledgeable – which is why they are the best in the biz!

Sign up by the March 17th deadline to start integrating herbs into your daily life!

The Herbal Academy’s Introductory Herbal Course features all-new expanded lessons, fresh videos, hundreds of recipes, new multimedia resources, and experiential exercises that will take your learning off your computer and into your kitchen!

I’ve gotta say, this course is legit!

Through the Herbal Academy’s Herbal Basics Class, you will get an introduction to the herbal approach, learn why herbs are important, and how to use them in teas, infusions, decoctions, tinctures, syrups, topical applications, and body care products.

You will get a taste of the popular Introductory Herbal Course, building your confidence using herbs in your own home!

Features of this free Introductory Herbal Course:

● 32 In-depth lessons including the very latest research, presented in a clear, easy-to-digest way!
● Detailed Recipe Book
● Dedicated and beautifully presented materia medica charts for each body system discussed
● 75 herbal monographs
● A Tea Booklet – full of tea recipes
● Beautiful helpful videos to enhance your learning
● Inspiring media and learning charts
● Experiential exercises to bring your studies to life

Registration for this free Herbal Basics Class, an exclusive offer, is only available for a limited time! The special enrollment period runs through March 17th.

https://theherbalacademy.com/free-herbal-basics-class-herbal-academy/

 

Salud!

p.s. Be sure to subscribe to Self-help Health so you don’t miss any future posts, and tell your friends to do the same. Also check out my website’s To Your Health page and Evolution Made Easier blog for more helpful health tips, tools and information.

Disclaimer: Please note that any information here is provided as a guideline only, and is not meant to substitute for the advice of your physician, nutritionist, trained health care practitioner, and/or inner guidance system. Always consult a professional before undertaking any change to your normal health routine.

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Worried About EMFs? Then You Should Know About Shungite!

 

 

The Amazing Power of Shungite

You know how it is when you have never heard of or seen something, and then once you do it seems to start popping up everywhere? Well, that’s the way it was with shungite a couple of years ago. This rare mineral is found in only ONE place on the whole planet, which is in Russia,  and dates back 2 billion (that’s billion, with a “b”!) years. I find that in and of itself fascinating, but what really peaked my interest was shungites’s ability to help with a number of health conditions, as well as neutralize/off-set EMFs.

In fact, shungite offers wide ranging health benefits “stemming from its extremely unique molecular structure,” and is said to help with skin conditions, high blood pressure, allergies, inflammation and more. “It has unique physical and chemical properties due to its micro-structure (atomic structure, conductivity, and magnetic properties) and consists of unusually large, hollow, and stable carbon structures with a high oxidative and reductive capacity, which is where shungite derives its antioxidant properties.”

I found that information and more amazing facts about shungite in a great little booklet titled Shungite: The Electro-pollution Solution, written and offered as a free download by Valerie Burke, who creates jewelry and other objects made of shungite that help people in dealing with all the “radiation smog” that has become a part of daily life. You can go here to download the pdf , and here to check out the products she offers and also learn about making shungite water, which I started making about 2 months ago. There are also videos on YouTube about it.

Another option for getting shungite jewelry is Vibes Up, one of my favorite places for items that off-set EMFs, balance and energize the body, and so much more. I’ve written several posts about some of the VU products and use a number of them on a daily basis. After getting a “donut” pendant (which I wear everywhere, except in the shower) for myself and sweet little shungite sphere in a bowl of baby crystals for my computer desk, plus some elite/noble stones for water through Valerie’s Shungite Queen website, I got a couple of “chippy” bracelets from VU and wear those almost all the time. AND I just learned that Kaitlyn at VU has a couple of great deals going right now….one is a $99 Vibration Essentials 11 piece kit that’s valued at $462 AND a 70% off on jewelry special! Shungite is NOT inexpensive and often hard to find, since it’s such a rare mineral, so now would be a great time to get some for yourself and your loved ones.

Both Valerie and Kaitlyn are so big-hearted and devoted to giving you great customer service and quality products that you can’t go wrong at either site. And keep in mind that the holiday season is fast approaching (how did that happen?!) and the type of items they create would make not only unique, but also uplifting, health-promoting gifts for anyone on your list, especially those surrounded by technology, which is pretty much everyone these days. So download your free shungite report and then get a jump on your shopping at either or both of these sites. Personally, I love knowing my dollars are being spent to support businesses like these!

12/7/18 Update: Valerie has written an even more extensive and updated version of her information on shungite in this article she did for GreenMedInfo. Here’s an excerpt:

In repeated experiments, Martino has been able to measure the effects of shungite—and hundreds of other minerals—on human vital fields. She has developed a highly reliable, reproducible way to measure these energetic fluctuations. She has found that shungite, more than any other rock, is able to realign the chakras and optimize the vital field. Essentially, shungite transforms artificial EMFs into biologically compatible frequencies, thereby neutralizing their negative impact. In other words, it transforms harmful radiation—not by eliminating it but by changing its properties. This can happen whether the shungite is in direct contact with your body or just nearby.

In particular, shungite greatly increases or concentrates of the vital field in the first chakra, or “root chakra.” The density of our energy (density here is a good thing) is directly linked to the strength of our first chakra. When we feel weak or depleted our energy density is low, but when it’s high we experience greater resistance to external disturbances and a better capacity to recover from illness or emotional trauma. Martino writes much more about this in her book.

Related Self-help Health post: EMFs, Your Health & VIbes UP

 

Salud!

p.s. Be sure to subscribe to Self-help Health so you don’t miss any future posts, and tell your friends to do the same. Also check out my website’s To Your Health page and Evolution Made Easier blog for more helpful health tips, tools and information.

Disclaimer: Please note that any information here is provided as a guideline only, and is not meant to substitute for the advice of your physician, nutritionist, trained health care practitioner, and/or inner guidance system. Always consult a professional before undertaking any change to your normal health routine.

 

Clear The Air Of Bacteria AND More With…..Smudging!

 

Turns out smudging has been proven to clear the air of more than just “bad vibes”……

(image: spiritscience.net)

Smudging has long been recognized as an effective way of removing negative energy and evil spirits, but does this spiritual practice have more to offer? New data reveals a reason that everyone, regardless of their spiritual beliefs, should give this ancient cleansing technique a try.

Despite the fact that many Americans view the practice of smudging your home as a ‘new age’ technique, it can be traced back thousands of years to the teachings of the Native Americans, used to cleanse their spirit. Also known as the ‘Sacred Smoke Bowl Blessing’, practitioners would burn herbs in a special bowl, the smoke created believed to be the cleansing property. Today, dried herbs tied together known as smudge sticks make the process even easier.

Many view the practice as skeptical at best, questioning whether those who practice today genuinely see any benefit from their efforts, or whether this ‘spiritual shower’ is merely a placebo effect. After all, if we truly believe that negativity has been removed from our lives, focusing on the positive side of life would that not, in turn, evoke the law of attraction, our own positivity, in turn, attracting more? At the same time, if it’s working and bringing more positivity into the world, is it really a bad thing?

If you’ve been wavering on giving this technique a try in your own life, a new study published in the ‘Journal of Ethnopharmacology’ looked closely at the practice of studying and the potential physical impact it may have on our lives. The research team looked at the use of single and multi-ingredient herbal and non-herbal smudging remedies as they were administered across 50 different countries.

Surprisingly, they found the use of smoke as a delivery system was more common than they had previously believed, largely used to address pulmonary, neurological and dermatological concerns. This medicinal use of smoke, the team explained, showed great promise and should be explored by those practicing modern medicine as a potential drug delivery system for many of today’s modern remedies. Furthermore, the team found that smudging was an effective way to cleanse a room not only of negative energy but also of airborne bacteria, improving air quality!

In their research, the team revealed that a 1-hour treatment of the medicinal smoke, created by burning both wood and a ‘mixture of odoriferous and medicinal herbs’ was effective in removing over 94% of the airborne bacterial populations in the space. This meant that the smudging treatment was equally as effective to, or even more effective than modern antibacterial sprays without the use of potentially harmful chemicals. Adding to the promise, a month after the smudging was completed the bacteria was still undetectable in the space.

As we continue to better understand the impact that many of these pathogens have on our lives, our society pushes the use of these chemical concoctions to kill off as many of these harmful bacteria as we can. However, this data raises the question – are we unnecessarily introducing more chemicals into our lives. Did we have the answer all along? For those that believe in its effectiveness, and it’s hard not to given these facts, smudging may be the safer, all -natural approach to protecting ourselves and our homes!

Article Source: https://awarenessact.com/study-reveals-how-smudging-does-a-lot-more-than-clear-evil-spirits/?=tet

And here’s a good article that goes into even more benefits of smudging, like stress reduction and allergy relief, plus has in-depth “how to” instructions for those who are new to the practice. It makes the process seem rather complicated and ritualistic, but just follow what feels right to you…..

https://www.naturallivingideas.com/smudging/

More research and details on the benefits of smudging can be found in this article from GreenMedInfo.com.

 

FYI, you can find a variety of smudge packs and other natural remedies at discount prices at iHerb.com (use code CJG192 if you are a new customer and spend more than $40 and you will get $5 off your purchase). Plus, you can take advantage of their wonderful Trial Offer and Specials sections; shipping is free on orders of $20 or more, you earn loyalty rewards cash, AND you get an extra 5% off on orders over $60. 

Sivana offers a number of smudge kits and related items, and for those who are looking for a smoke-less way to enhance the air quality in their environment, Vitacost.com, which is another one of my favorite on-line places to shops, carries Heritage Products Aura Smudge. Great discount prices, ever-expanding inventory, free shipping on $49 and up, and if you are a new customer and use the link on my website you will get a $10 off coupon with your first order of $25 or more. Woo-hoo! 

 

Salud!

p.s. Be sure to subscribe to Self-help Health so you don’t miss any future posts, and tell your friends to do the same. Also check out my website’s To Your Health page and Evolution Made Easier blog for more helpful health tips, tools and information.

Disclaimer: Please note that any information here is provided as a guideline only, and is not meant to substitute for the advice of your physician, nutritionist, trained healthcare practitioner, and/or inner guidance system. Always consult a professional before undertaking any change to your normal health routine.

Free Docu-series About Natural Remedies, YogaQuest Masterclass, Money & Success E-book And More!

 

Just a quick post to let you know about these free resources for you to check out!

 

Sign up for this new groundbreaking documentary series called Remedy: Ancient Medicines for Modern Illness by Nick Polizzi, who has been working hard to put together something that is well worth your time.

The Remedy docuseries will take you on an unforgettable journey into the heart of Green Medicine. A journey that will open your eyes to a revolutionary new perspective on health and healing.

A number of the natural solutions explored in Remedy have been used to successfully treat and even reverse the most devastating illnesses we humans face… cancer, heart disease, autoimmune disorders, diabetes, Alzheimer’s… even Lyme Disease. You know this, we use them in our superfoods blends …

These ancient remedies have also been proven to reverse the common health challenges that we face as we get older like – chronic pain, stress and anxiety disorders, insomnia and chronic fatigue.

You can discover the power of Ancient Medicines by signing up for this free series here. The series has already started, but there are replays of the sessions available. And usually on the weekend they make the whole series available for those who missed it or want to re-watch certain episodes.


 

And check out my What’s New page for information about two free Masterclasses from MindValley. One is as new offering called YogaQuest…….

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Yoga isn’t just a “workout” — It’s also a “work-IN.” And to prove to you that anyone–even you—can cultivate a beautiful yoga practice, you can follow along to a gentle and rejuvenating 20-minute yoga flow during the Masterclass itself that’s perfect for beginners and seasoned practitioners alike.

The other Masterclass that I know you’ll enjoy and find very useful is Embrace Your Energy Body with Jeffrey Allen. I’ve taken several of his classes and courses and always find them to be entertaining, insightful and very helpful with all areas of my life…..

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Sign up for the Embrace Your Energy Body Masterclass being offered by MindValley and experience for yourself how easy and enjoyable learning to work with energy can be. This class is a great way to dip your toes in the water and get an idea of what taking Jeffrey’s Duality course would be like. I highly recommend attending the Masterclass and taking Duality. You will likely end up feeling that it is one of the best life decisions you have ever made, AND the on-line community connected with the course is one of the best around!

Ready to give yourself the gift of greater self-awareness, new possibilities, improved health, more alignment with your heart’s desire, and tools to simplify, enhance and expand your life and well-being?


 

And finally, here’s a free e-book being offered by The Tapping Solution (EFT) as an intro to their Financial Success & Personal Fulfillment series that starts in a few days…..

 

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You can find out more about these three freebies on my What’s New webpage.

 

Salud!

p.s. Be sure to subscribe to Self-help Health so you don’t miss any future posts, and tell your friends to do the same. Also check out my website’s To Your Health page and Evolution Made Easier blog for more helpful health tips, tools and information.

Disclaimer: Please note that any information here is provided as a guideline only, and is not meant to substitute for the advice of your physician, nutritionist, trained healthcare practitioner, and/or inner guidance system. Always consult a professional before undertaking any change to your normal health routine.

Wow! Lots of Edible Flowers to enhance your meals!

 

Wow, I was aware of some of these, but never realized there were so many options of edible flowers! I’m excited and relieved  that spring is finally showing its face (we had an extra cold winter) and things are starting to bloom. I volunteer in a community garden and we grow a number of the flowers and herbs listed here, so now I’ll know to be picking even more of a variety to use in my salads than I did before. Delightful to have the added color and nutrition!

 

List of Edible Flowers

List of Edible Flowers

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Before you venture out to the garden and harvest a bunch of flowers for the dinner table, it’s important to remember that some flowers are poisonous. Make sure you’ve made a positive identification of each variety you’re using. Obviously, you should avoid flowers that may have been sprayed with pesticides or other chemicals, so either grow your own organic flowers, or harvest them from a location you’re sure about. Organic or not, all flowers should be shaken and washed in cold water prior to use, as they may to be homes for insects.

Pick your edible flowers in the morning, when they have the highest water content. Keep them on some dampened paper towel inside a sealed container in the refrigerator for as long as a week. You can revive wilted flowers by floating them in some ice water for a few minutes. Prepare them for eating just before serving in order to prevent further wilting.

Remove the stamens and styles from flowers before eating. Pollen can cause allergic reactions when eaten by some people, and it may overwhelm the otherwise delicate flavour of the petals. The exception here is the Violas, including Johnny-Jump-Ups and pansies, as well as scarlet runner beans, honeysuckle and clover. The flowers of these varieties can be enjoyed whole, and will probably be more flavourful this way.

This list of Edible Flowers is not comprehensive so if you notice a flower missing from this list, please do further research before you consider it edible. Don’t assume that all flowers are edible – some are highly poisonous.

Agastache BloomsAgastache – Anise Hyssop (Agastache foeniculum) is also sometimes known as licorice mint. Both the young leaves and the striking purple flowers have a mild licorice flavour. Pull the purple flower tubes away from the central structure of the flower and scatter them in salads or fancy drinks for a pop of colour and flavour.

Angelica – This relative of celery (Angelica archangelica) has licorice-scented pinkish flowers borne in large umbels. The flowers make an interesting addition to salads, but it is mostly grown for its stronger-tasting leaves.

Apple – Be sure to only try flowers from trees that have not been sprayed. Apple blossoms (Malus spp.) have an appealing but delicate flavour and scent. They work particularly well with fresh fruit salads. Use in moderation, as the flowers contain very low levels of poisonous chemicals.

Edible flowers arugula flowersArugula – Once this cool-season plant (Eruca vesicaria) begins to bolt, its leaves will have become tough and almost too spicy to eat. So let it bolt, and enjoy some of its very small, spicy, white or yellow flowers. They add a nice, unusual zing to salads.

Edible basil flowersBasil – Most growers use basil’s leaves (Ocimum basilicum) before the plant has flowered. After blooming, the character of the leaves changes and becomes less appealing, but the flowers can be eaten. They may be white to lavender, but they look stunning when sprinkled over pasta. Thai basil is sometimes allowed to flower before whole stems, with leaves attached, are harvested. The whole flower is edible.

Edible tuborous begonia flowersBegonia – both tuberous (Begonia x tuberhybrida) and wax (B. x semperflorens-cultorum) begonias have edible flowers with a slightly bitter to sharp citrus flavour. Tuberous begonia flowers contain oxalic acid, so should be avoided by people suffering from kidney stones, gout, or rheumatism.

Edible flowers of Bergamot, wildBergamot, wild – This plant (Monarda fistulosa) may be listed as bee balm, Monarda, Wild Bergamot, Oswego Tea, or Horsemint. The flowers (and the young leaves) have an intense flavour of mint with undertones of citrus and oregano. This plant that has a scent highly reminiscent of Earl Grey tea. Somewhat confusingly, the “oil of bergamot” used to flavour Earl Grey is actually derived from citrus peel from the Bergamot Orange. Monarda flowers are formed by large clusters of edible tubular petals that can be separated before adding to cakes, fancy drinks, or salads.

Borage edible flowersBorage – This familiar garden herb (Borago officnialis) has furry leaves and exquisite blue, star-shaped flowers. Both have a cooling taste reminiscent of cucumber. Try some of the flowers in a summer lemonade or sorbet – or a gin & tonic! They work particularly well as garnishes for gazpacho, cheese plates, or just sprinkled over salads.

Calendula Seeds in bloomCalendula – All “pot marigolds” (Calendula officinalis) have flower petals that are edible. They have a nice flavour that ranges from peppery to bitter, and they add bright yellow, gold, and orange colour to soups and salads. They may even tint some dishes like saffron does.

Edible chamomile flowersChamomile – Choose the German chamomile (Matricaria chamomilla syn. M. recutita) for its daisy-like flowers. They can be used fresh or dried, and make a particularly nice tea that tastes vaguely like apples. Drink the tea in moderation – some allergy sufferers may have a negative response. Otherwise, sprinkle the petals into salads and soups.

Chervil – The lacy leaves of this shade-loving herb (Anthriscus cerefolium) are topped by delicate white flowers borne in umbels. Both the leaves and the flowers have a very mild anise or licorice-like taste. Add chervil to your dishes just before serving to maintain the best flavour.

Edible flowers of chicoryChicory – All endive varieties (Cichorium endivia & C. intybus) produce, at summer’s end, tall stems with striking, sky-blue flowers. The petals can be pulled off and added to salads for their earthy, endive-like flavour. The unopened flower buds can also be pickled like capers.

List of edible flowers including chivesChives – The flowers of chives (Allium schoenoprasum) are ball-like clusters of hundreds of little florets that can be separated and scattered onto salads for colour and a mild onion flavour.

Shungiku edible chrysanthemum flowersChrysanthemum – The edible chrysanthemum and garland Chrysanthemum (both are Leucanthemum coronarium) that we offer produce both edible young leaves and appealing white daisy-like flowers with yellow centres, or flowers that are entirely yellow. The petals of both types are edible and faintly tangy.

Edible flowers of cilantroCilantro – This leafy herb (Coriandrum sativum) is also known as Coriander. In summer heat it is quick to bolt, and will send up tall umbels of white flowers. These have an intensely herbal flavour, just like the leaves, roots, and seeds of the plant, and can be used as a garnish where cilantro leaves would otherwise be used.

Edible clover flowersClover– The flower heads of clover (Trifolium spp.) are edible, and have a sweet, mild licorice flavour. In fact, the whole above ground plant is edible, but it’s best to grow clover as tender sprouts or to use the flower tubes in moderation as a salad garnish. Mature clover is tough to digest, and may cause bloating.

Blossoms of Cornflower Seeds in bloomCornflower – The pretty, blue flowers of cornflower (Centaurea cyanus) have a slightly spicy, clove-like flavour with a subtle sweetness. Cornflower petals look wonderful in salads. Use torn petals as a garnish, or whole flowers in fancy drinks.

Dame’s Rocket – The petals of this tall relative of mustard (Hesperis matronalis) are pink, lavender, or white, and always come in fours. Perennial Phlox looks similar, and also has edible flowers, but always have five petals. The petals (and the immature leaves) of Dame’s Rocket are worth adding to salads, but have a mild bitter flavour.

Edible dandelion flowersDandelion – The ubiquitous dandelion (Taxacum officinalis) is entirely edible. When picked small, and unopened, the flower buds have a surprising sweetness, reminiscent of honey. Young greens are also tasty either raw or steamed. Dandelion petals look very nice when scattered over pasta or rice. While dandelions are rather easy to come by, make sure to harvest them only from organic gardens. Avoid any grown near roads or picked from lawns where chemicals may be present. Check out this Self-help Health post on dandelion.

Edible day lilies flowersDay Lilies – The fleshy, short-lived flowers of day lilies (Hemerocallis spp.) are sweet, with a flavour resembling mild melon or cucumber. Make sure to cut the tasty petals away from the bitter base of each flower. Try them in salads! Eat in moderation.

How to Grow DianthusDianthus – Look for the large-flowered carnation (Dianthus caryophyllus), and cut the sweet tasting petals away from the bitter white base of each flower. The bright red and pink petals have a mild clove flavour and are great for desserts or salads.

Edible dill flowersDill – Stronger in flavour than the leaves, the flowers of dill (Anethum graveolens) can be used when cooking fish, or raw in salads. They are very small, yellow, and borne on tall umbels. Best used when they have just opened, as they set seed quickly.

Edible flowers English daisyEnglish Daisy – The low growing flowers (Bellis perennis) have a bitter flavour, but are entirely edible. They are small enough to use simply by sprinkling the petals onto salads or other meals, and will not overwhelm stronger flavours.

How to grow Florence fennel Selma Fino Fennel Seeds HR1089-1Fennel – Both the garden herb and the vegetable Florence fennel(both are Foeniculum vulgare) will eventually produce attractive and tall umbels of tiny yellow flowers that have the same mild licorice flavour as the leaves. These work very well in desserts!

Edible fuchsia flowersFuchsia – Avoid nursery-bought Fuchsia (Fuchsia x hybrida) flowers, as they may have been sprayed. Otherwise, the extraordinary looking flowers make great garnishes and have a slightly acidic flavour.

Garlic scapes

Garlic Scapes!

Garlic – Allowed to open, garlic flowers (Allium sativum) are pink to white, with florets that can be separated and inserted into salads for a mild garlic zing. However, allowing the plants to flower may divert energy that would otherwise go to the bulb. Many garlic growers prefer to cut the flower stems (scapes) before they open. These can be sautéed in butter for an intense, early summer side dish, or run through the food processor and mixed with Parmesan cheese, olive oil, and pine nuts for a sensational pesto.

Hollyhocks edible flowersHollyhock – The large, brightly coloured flowers of common hollyhocks (Alcea rosea) have almost no flavour of their own, but they sure look nice cut into salads or sprinkled over desserts. Be sure to use the petals only – cut these away from the central structure of the flower just before serving.

Honeysuckle – The long flower tubes of various honeysuckle species are edible, but Japanese honeysuckle (Lonicera japonica) is best, with its distinctly honey-like flavour. Do not eat the berries that follow, or any other part of the plant, as they are all poisonous.

Impatiens – The flowers of Impatiens (Impatiens walleriana) may be bright white or shocking red, but the petals are edible and have a surprisingly sweet taste. They can be torn into salad or mixed into fancy drinks.

Johnny-Jump-UpJohnny-Jump-Up – This plant (Viola tricolor) produces masses of small, brightly coloured flowers that have a faint wintergreen taste. They look great served on cakes, served with soft cheeses, or as a topping for salads. Use the whole flower intact.

French LavenderLavender – Pull the clustered flowers of lavender (Lavandula angustifolia) apart and sprinkle a few pieces onto chocolate cake. Submerge one or two pieces in a glass of chilled champagne. The sweet, intensely floral flavour of lavender should be used with restraint, but adds an incredible to pop savory dishes as well as desserts.

Edible flowers lemon bergamotLemon Bergamot – Like its wild cousin above, Lemon Bergamot (Monarda citriodora) has a perfume-like, intense, almost astringent quality, but it is strongly scented with citrus. Use portions of the flower conservatively in drinks or desserts or in herbal teas.

Lilac – Like lavender, the flowers of lilac (Syringa vulgaris) have an intensely floral, almost perfumey flavour with lemon undertones. A little goes a long way, but one or two individual flowers added to a summer punch looks wonderful and tastes very refreshing.

Gold Gem Edible FlowersLemon Marigold Tagetes tenuifolia

Edible marigold flowersMarigold – Both French marigolds (Tagetes patula) and African marigolds (T. erecta) produce flowers that are technically edible, but the pungent scent is probably worth avoiding. African marigold flowers are used as a food colourant in Europe, but have only been approved for use as a poultry feed additive in the US. However,T. tenuifolia has a refreshing citrus, lemony flavour, and its petals work well torn into salads or smart drinks.

PeppermintMint – All mint varieties (Mentha spp.) have minty-flavoured, edible flowers that may be sweet or lemon-scented, or even with chocolate overtones depending on the type.

Edible Nasturtium flowersNasturtium – All garden nasturtiums (Tropaeolum majus) produce edible flowers and leaves. Even the fresh seeds can be pickled like capers. Curiously this familiar garden flower is a cousin of the Brassica family (cabbage, broccoli, mustards, etc…). All parts of the nasturtium have a pleasant, sweet, peppery flavour. The flowers can be used whole to decorate salads and a variety of other foods, but you may want to remove the long spur at the back of the flower, as this is the nectary and may harbour small insects.

*For more on nasturtiums, check out the link to an article at the end of this post.

Edible pansies flowersPansy – The flower petals of the familiar garden pansy (Viola x wittrockiana) are edible and highly decorative. The petals have little flavour, but the whole flower can also be used. It has a grassy, wintergreen undertone that works well in fruit salad.

Edible pea flowersPea – Edible garden peas (Pisum sativum) produce edible flowers that look great in salads. Serve a blend of peas in a meal: shelled peas, pea tendrils, pea pods, and some flowers for garnish. Note: Ornamental sweet peas are poisonous.

Perennial Phlox – Be certain that you’ve got the tall-growing perennial garden Phlox (Phlox paniculata), and not the inedible annual, creeping type before you try the flowers. The perennial type bears pink to white flowers with five petals that have a pleasant, peppery flavour. They look great and taste great in fruit salads.

Primrose – With its bland, but highly colourful flowers, primrose (Primula vulgaris) is worth cultivating if only to tear its petals into a few summer salads. The flower buds can also be pickled, steamed, or fermented into wine.

Queen Anne’s Lace – The Wild Carrot (Daucus carota) produces tall umbels of exquisite, tiny, white flowers, each one marked by a blood-red centre. Although this plant is grown for its decorative, edible flowers, it can cross-pollinate with its close relative the carrot, so if you happen to be growing carrots with the intent of saving seed, avoid this plant in your garden. The flowers of Queen Anne’s Lace have a mild, carroty flavour. Be absolutely certain that the plant you are harvesting is not the invasive weed known as Wild or Poison Hemlock (Conium maculatum), which looks very similar. The stems of Queen Anne’s Lace are hairy, while Poison Hemlock has smooth, hollow stems with purple spots.

Garden party rose seeds FL2061 1Rose – Another surprisingly edible garden flower is the rose (Rosa spp.). Although its petals are intensely perfumed, their flavour is subtler and a bit fruity, with complex undertones that depend on the variety and soil conditions. The petals of all roses are edible, but you should remove the bitter white base of each petal. Be sure to use only rose flowers that have been organically grown from a reliable source, as nearly all nursery or cut flower roses will have been treated with pesticide.

Rosemary edible flowersRosemary – It takes nimble fingers to pull the strongly scented flowers of rosemary (Rosmarinus officinalis) from between the tightly packed leaves. The leaves contain more oil than the flowers, but both are similar in flavour. Use the flowers as you would the herb. Flowers are deep blue to pink, depending on the soil.

Safflower edible flowersSafflower – The dried yellow flowers (Carthamus tinctorius) are sometimes sold as Mexican saffron, and used like saffron as a food dye. Otherwise, fresh petals can be torn into salads, soups, and sauces. They have a very mild flavour of their own.

Sage makes the list of edible flowersSage – The deep blue flowers of sage (Salvia officinalis) add an interesting mild-sage flavour to salads or savory dishes. Pull individual flower tubes from the stems and use with discretion, as the taste is strong.

Scarlet runner bean edible flowersScarlet Runner Bean – The flowers of this vine (Phaseolus vulgaris) are vivid, intense red, and also delicious. They make excellent garnishes for soups and salads, providing a real visual high note.

Large Leaf Organic SorrelSorrel – Like the leaves of sorrel (Rumex acetosa), its flowers have a strongly lemony flavour, and can be scattered over salad or used in sauces. The flavour comes from oxalic acid, so should be avoided by those with kidney conditions or rheumatism.

Squash-BlossomSquash – Both male and female flowers of all squash and zucchini varieties are edible, and have a faint squashy flavour. It may be sensible to only use the male flowers, as they will not form fruits. They can be torn into salads or stuffed with savory items like herbs and goat cheese, and then fried in a light tempura batter. There are many squash blossom recipes online.

Edible sunflower flowersSunflower – It’s still a little known fact that unopened sunflower (Helianthus annuus) buds can be steamed or sautéed in butter and served whole. They have an artichoke-like flavour. Alternately, the petals can be pulled from the edge of the opened flower and added to soups and salads. Their flavour is somewhat bitter.

Violet – Many varieties (Viola spp.) are suitable for decorating food. They come in a range of sweet, perfumed flavours, and a wide range of colours. Some of the tiniest violet flowers make the best additions to cakes, drinks, and salads.

(You can get seeds for these plants at westcoastseeds.com, the source of this article, as well as elsewhere.)

Source: https://www.westcoastseeds.com/garden-resources/articles-instructions/list-edible-flowers/

*Dr. Joseph Mercola recently did an article about growing and eating nasturtiums that includes the following highlights:

  • Nasturtiums — colorful flowers that are fast and easy to grow — provide edible blooms known for their peppery tang
  • As their name suggests, you can be “nasty” to nasturtiums because they do well in lean soil and thrive even when somewhat neglected
  • Nasturtiums not only contain beneficial amounts of vitamin C, beta carotene, iron and manganese, but they also boast the highest lutein content of any edible plant
  • Some of the purported medicinal uses for nasturtiums include fighting bacterial and fungal infections, neutralizing free radicals, promoting hair growth, soothing colds and coughs and treating skin conditions

You can read the full article here.

Update 7/3/18: Here’s even more on edible flowers, this time from an article by Mary Houston featured in La Casa Day Spa’s newsletter. It also includes some recipes at the end…….

FLOWER POWER

History of Eating Flowers:
Flowers have been included in food as far back as we have records. Ancient Greek, Roman and Chinese herbalists recorded medicinal and culinary uses for flowers. The early Incas, Aztecs and Hindus included flowers in their most important rituals. Nearly every early civilization recognized calendula, whose petals were served as food and piled on altars. Information also is available on the use of edible flowers from the medieval and Victorian periods.
Historical Names:
The Romans recognized calendula blooming on the first day of the month, so they named it accordingly. The valued petals of saffron (Crocus Sativus) were preserved for medicinal uses, so calendula was used to infuse a similar golden color in cooked dishes. Calendula was commonly referred to as “pot marigold” by medieval monks who used it in their cooking pots. The monks also named the wild pansy (Viola Tricolor). These little purple and yellow flowers are the parents of the larger modern hybrid pansy. Bee balm (Monarda Didyma) is very popular with bees but also was used as a poultice for bee stings. Early carnations were called “Pinks” by the Victorians. The species were pink in color but they also had ruffled petals that looked as if they were cut with pinking shears.
List of Flowers (and their main flavot attributes):
Anise Hyssop, (sweet & licorice-like)
Arugula Flowers (spicy or peppery)
Banana Blossoms (bitter when raw)
Basil Flowers (lemony or minty)
Bee Balm (citrus)
Borage (cucumber)
Burnet (cucumber)
Carnations (sweet)
Chamomile (apple-like)
Chicory Flowers (bitter)
Chive Blossom(onion-like)
Chrysanthemum (tangy)
Clover (sweet)
Coriander (strong herbal flavor, to be used before cooking)
Cornflowers AKA Bachelor’s Button (clove-like)
Dandelion (sweet when young, bitter when mature)
Day Lily (light and sweet)
Dianthus (spicy)
Dill Flowers (stronger flavor than leaves or seeds)
Elder Flower (sweet)
English Daisy (mildly bitter)
Fennel Flower (sweet and licorice-like)
Gardenia( sweet)
Hibiscus (citrus)
Honeysuckle (sweet)
Jasmine (sweet)
Johnny Jump-Ups (wintergreen-like flavor)
Lavender (sweet)
Lilac (citrus)
Linden (honey)
Mallow Flowers (sweet)
Marigolds AKA Calendula (spicy or peppery)
Marjoram (milder than the leaf)
Mustard Flowers (mustardy)
Nasturtiums (sweet and spicy)
Pansy (mildly sweet)
Primrose (sweet)
Queen Anne’s Lace (carrot-like)
Roses (sweet)
Sage Flowers (lighter flavor than sage)
Squash Blossoms (like squash)
Sunflower (artichoke-like)
Thyme Flowers (milder thyme flavor)
Tiger Lily (turnip-like)
Tulip (lettuce-like)
Violet (sweet)
Yucca Flowers (mildly sweet)
Zucchini Flowers (zucchini-like)
Identification:
There are similarities among edible flowers that likely helped our ancestors decide on their safety. The majority of edible flowers are also butterfly staples, as the larvae eat the petals as a major food source. If they had contained dangerous compounds, the larvae would have likely succumbed. Our ancestors also knew that the flowers of culinary herbs like sage, lavender and oregano contained lower levels of the same constituents as the foliage. Their brave experimentation allows us to eat these edible flowers today without concern. Unfortunately, the poisons present in such flowers as monkshood (Aconite) were discovered in the same manner.
Uses
Historically, flower petals were eaten most often fresh in salads or as garnishes. The petals of carnation, bee balm, borage, sage, violet, nasturtium, day lily and calendula were commonly eaten. They were thought to be cleansing for the body as well as attractive. It was common to dry the petals and include them in tea blends. Popular tea flowers were hibiscus, rose, jasmine and bee balm.
  • Bee balm was used as a tea substitute when black tea became unavailable during the Boston Tea Party in 1773.
  • To preserve violets, medieval monks would make a sweet syrup from the petals.
  • The Victorians, who associated edible flowers with elegance, candied the flowers of violet and borage to decorate cakes and desserts.
  • In China still today day lilies are used in foods, and are often stuffed and also used as snacks with tea. We all have tasted Jasmine Tea. You often find them in Sweet & Sour soups and dishes.
  • The Indians use calendula to spread on top of rice, and marigold is the poor man’s saffron. They also use Rose petals and Rose Water for firey personalities and to cool down an over-acidic body or simply as a lovely cool drink with yogurt and water… Lassi.
  • In the Chelsea Market in Great Britain they sell a huge variety of flowers for teas and other uses.
  • The French love their lavender, in tea to relax and de-stress; a sprig of lavender in Champagne
  • Lavender flowers on top of a chocolate cake, and small lavender flowers in sorbets.
  • The Greeks like to eat their big meal in the middle of the day (very sensible by the way), and their lighter meal in the evening. They often make an omelet with squash flowers as their later meal.
  • The American Indians used the whole white clover plants in salads and made a medicinal tea of white clover blossoms for coughs and colds.
WARNING: Not all flowers are edible. Make sure the flowers you are about to eat are edible. Search on line. Also make sure you don’t eat flowers from florists or off the side of the road. They should come from pesticide free gardens that are grown on good soil. Flowers have varying degrees of nutritional value depending on how and where they are grown: roses are high in Vit. C; lilies in Vit. A and C; and Nasturtiums in C and minerals.
Here are a few flower recipes:
A SALAD OF FLOWERS AND HERBS
Ingredients:
  • One head red leaf lettuce, cleaned and torn
  • 1 cup mixed herbs (marjoram, thyme, oregano or herbs de Provence)
  • Picked over and cleaned 1 cup petals, day lilies, roses and nasturtium
  • Dressing:
  • 1/2 cup pink grapefruit juice from grapefruit
  • 1/4 teaspoon salt
  • 5 turns freshly ground black pepper
  • Grated zest of one orange
  • 1/2 cup grape seed oil
Directions:
Toss together in a large bowl the lettuce, herbs and flowers.
Combine all the dressing ingredients except the oil in a 12-ounce jar with a lid. Cover and shake. Allow to sit for about 15 minutes; then pour in the oil. Shake well again. Store chilled. Stream 1/4 cup dressing around the edge of the bowl and toss to coat.
DAY LILY FRITTERS
Ingredients:
  • 1 cup unbleached white flour or Einkorn flour which has less gluten and is very light (good for delicate flowers)
  • 1 Tbsp baking powder
  • 1/2 tsp sea salt
  • 1 cup ice cold soda water or apple cider
  • 2 to 3 cups grapeseed oil for frying
  • 1 to 2 pounds of fresh day lily buds
Directions:
In a small to medium-sized bowl, whisk the flour, baking powder, and salt together until fully mixed. Add 1 cup of cold soda water (be sure it’s ice cold as this will help your batter crisp up nicely) and gently whisk, being careful not to over-mix. A few lumps in the batter are ok and preferable to an over-mixed batter as you don’t want the gluten to develop.
In a small heavy skillet or saucepan, heat the grapeseed oil over medium heat. The oil should be just a little more than an inch deep and should reach a temperature of about 350 F to 375F. I rarely take a temperature reading, instead I simply drop a bit of batter into the oil as a test. If it starts to sizzle and bubble right away, the oil is ready. It’s important to make sure the oil is hot enough because hot oil prevents your batter from absorbing too much oil as it fries.
Once your oil has reached temperature, grab your day lily buds by the stem and dip each one into the batter. It’s ok for the green stem to stick out of the batter; it will fry up and be delicious to eat as well. I find working in small batches is best, no more than 5 fritters in the oil at a time to properly monitor them. Drop each battered bud into the oil carefully to avoid splashing, and allow it to fry for about 1 minute or until crisp and golden; then flip it on the other side using tongs and fry it for about another minute. Remove the fritter from the oil and place it on a sheet of paper towel to absorb any excess oil. Eat warm, with a sprinkle of sea salt or your favorite dipping sauce. Bon Appetit.
RAW DAY LILY APPETIZER
Ingredients:
  • 3 cups leaves and soft tops of wood sorrel
  • 1 cup pine nuts, soaked for 30 min.
  • ½ tsp. Celtic sea salt
  • 2 cloves garlic, peeled and finely minced
  • 35-40 unopened day lily buds
Directions:
Rinse wood sorrel and place it together with nuts, salt and garlic in the food processor. Blend until the mix resembles a thick paste. If necessary, add a touch of water to achieve the desired paste consistency. Separate the petals of the lily buds a little, and place ½ tsp. of the pesto between or on top of the buds. Serve as an appetizer.
DAY LILY SALAD
Ingredients:
  • 2 cups day lily buds (about 50 buds), sliced
  • 1 cup torn lettuce
  • 1/2 medium cucumber, sliced
  • 1 medium tomato, diced
  • 2 celery ribs, sliced
  • 1/4 cup shredded red cabbage
  • 3 radishes, sliced​
Directions:
Mix and add salad dressing of your choice
RECIPE FOR PANSY CREPES
Ingredients:
  • 3-4 free range organic eggs
  • 6 Tbs. of organic grape seed oil (or split with raw melted butter)
  • 2 Tbs organic sprouted spelt flour, Einkorn flour or a combination mixed with buckwheat flour
  • Alcohol free vanilla extract, 1/4 to 1/2 tsp.
  • Honey or stevia — just a bit (optional)
  • 1 cup of pansy flowers.
  • Butter for pan or oil
  • Crê​pe pan is best but not necessary.
Directions:
Beat ingredients together
Melt 1Tbs butter in pan or more if needed
Heat until sizzling
Take a small ladle full of batter and put in center of pan and swirl the pan until it reaches around the pan. Drop a handful of pansies onto the cooking crêpe.
They should cook pretty quickly, then flip to the other side — less than a minute.
Add your favorite topping — berries, or syrups, jams or jellies
The first crê​pe is a throw away. For some reason, they never come out well. But it tastes delicious so go for it.

 

Salud!

p.s. Be sure to subscribe to Self-help Health so you don’t miss any future posts, and tell your friends to do the same. Also check out my website’s To Your Health page and Evolution Made Easier blog for more helpful health tips, tools and information.

Disclaimer: Please note that any information here is provided as a guideline only, and is not meant to substitute for the advice of your physician, nutritionist, trained healthcare practitioner, and/or inner guidance system. Always consult a professional before undertaking any change to your normal health routine.

 

Dandelion: The “Weed” With Multiple Health Benefits

Two years ago around spring time I was taking a walk and noticing all the dandelions and wishing I knew more about their beneficial properties, and lo and behold when I got home there was actually an article in my in-box about them. Talk about synchronicity! That started me doing more research and putting this post together, although I never got around to actually finishing it. But with spring just around the corner again, this seems like the perfect time to finally get it done. 

Growing up I was taught that dandelions were weeds and part of my regular “chores” was to rid the front yard of them before the flowers got all “puff-bally” and turned to seed. After putting this post together, I am thankfully less clue-less 🙂 and amazed by the many uses dandelions have and consider us very fortunate to have them around. Often I’ll pick some leaves for a salad or the bright yellow flowers to add a little color to the room and them later use them in a tea. 

 

uses for dandelions

Dandelion – A Backyard Herb with Many Benefits

Did you know you’ve probably pulled, stomped or sprayed a natural superfood that grows in your backyard? Dandelion is mostly known as a backyard weed, but it has amazing nutrient qualities and health promoting properties.

All the parts of the plant can be used in various ways though the roots and leaves are the most commonly used as herbs. Who knew that this plant with puffy flowers that grant childhood wishes could offer so much benefit?

Dandelion Root and Leaves

Dandelion is a source of a variety of nutrients and the leaves and root contain Vitamins (like A, C, K and B-vitamins) as well as minerals (including magnesium, zinc, potassium, iron, calcium and choline). The various parts of the plant have a long history of use as an herbal remedy, and every documented population in areas where it grows naturally has used it medicinally.

It also serves as an abundant natural food source, as all parts of the plant can be eaten. The root is often roasted and used in teas or consumed whole. The leaves make a great addition to salads or other dishes requiring greens and the flowers (while still yellow), can be eaten raw, cooked or even made into wine!

Traditional cultures have used dandelion to support digestive and hormone health and it was often consumed to support lactation or to help remedy issues like urinary tract infections.

Dandelion - a backyard herb with many benefits

Benefits of Dandelion

According to the How To Herb Book, this backyard superfood is beneficial in many ways, including:

Liver Support and Detoxification

Dandelion has been used for years by various cultures to support healthy liver function and natural detoxification in the body. Though it hasn’t been well studied, many people with hepatitis turn to it to help support the liver. The University of Maryland Medical Center notes that:

In the past, roots and leaves were used to treat liver problems. Native Americans also boiled dandelion in water and took it to treat kidney disease, swelling, skin problems, heartburn, and upset stomach. In traditional Chinese medicine (TCM), it has been used to treat stomach problems, appendicitis, and breast problems, such as inflammation or lack of milk flow. In Europe, dandelion was used in remedies for fever, boils, eye problems, diabetes, and diarrhea.

Personal Note: Was just reading an article about Nick Polizzi’s 3 favorite herbs and dandelion made the list. Here’s part of what he wrote:

Its common name is a corruption of the French “Dent de Lion” or “lions tooth” – a reference to its jagged, toothlike leaves.

My friend and wild food expert, Daniel Vitalis, says that the herbs that our body needs the most tend to grow within a mile of us, just another way that mother earth looks out for her children.

To put it simply, dandelions are your liver’s best friend. Yes, your liver, the second largest organ in your body, which among many other duties serves as your body’s filter. If you have been eating “naughtily” and feel as though you have gunkily guk (my own scientific term) built up inside of you, the first course of action is to a) change your diet and b) nurture your liver so that it can process the toxins you’ve ingested and safely remove them from your system.

The best liver cleanser I know of is freshly brewed dandelion root tea. And I’m not alone in this theory. Folk healers and doctors were prescribing this long before our time. Another delicious way to promote liver health is to add dandelion greens to salads or sauté them alongside your protein.

Source: http://www.thesacredscience.com/3-ancient-medicines-that-already-live-in-your-home/

Female Health and Hormone Balance

Due to its high levels of various nutrients and potential ability to help support the body’s natural detoxification systems, dandelion is often used by those with hormone imbalance, urinary infection and recurrent mastitis. Though not well studied, there is an abundance of anecdotal evidence from women who have used it to help remedy recurring UTIs or other infections.

Clearer Skin

Due to its natural magnesium and zinc content and its potential ability to support detoxification, dandelion is also know as being good for the skin. It can be used topically in applications like tinctures and poultices and many people also take it in capsule or tea form to help support healthy skin.

Good Source of Nutrients

Dandelion is a great source of many important vitamins and minerals, as well as antioxidants and nutritive salts, which may help support blood health and increase iron absorption. I personally often add dried leaves to teas for a nutrient boost or use dandelion root in place of coffee.

Blood Sugar Balance

The University of Maryland Medical Center also reports that:

Preliminary animal studies suggest that dandelion may help normalize blood sugar levels and lower total cholesterol and triglycerides while raising HDL (good) cholesterol in diabetic mice. Researchers need to see if dandelion will work in people. A few animal studies also suggest that dandelion might help fight inflammation.

Uses of Dandelion Root and Leaves

Perhaps we wouldn’t be so quick to remove this “backyard weed” if we were more familiar with the myriad of uses it has. The entire dandelion plant can be used and if you have a safe (non-sprayed) source in your yard or community, you can consider harvesting it yourself.

Here are some of the ways to use dandelion:

Coffee Substitute

Dandelion root is tougher and more hardy than the leaf and is often used in decoctions and tinctures for this reason. The powder is often added in coffee substitutes (my favorite is Dandy Blend). The root is considered a natural diuretic and is sometimes used for this purpose.

Poultices

Dandelion root and leaf are often listed as the ingredients of  teas and poultices for abscesses and sores, especially on the breast and in female health remedies as they can help support lactation and remedy urinary issues.

According to Mountain Rose Herbs:

Chopped dandelion root can be combined with myrrh to make a poultice for boils and abscesses, with honeysuckle flowers to make a tea to be drunk to treat boils and abscesses, with skullcap and/or chrysanthemum flowers to make a tea to be drunk to treat sore eyes, or with heal-all to treat hard phlegm in bronchitis. Can also be administered in capsule or extract form for convenience.

Dandelion Tea

The flower can be used to make tea and even to make some types of wine. The leaves and root can also be used in teas, though they have a stronger taste and are often combined with other synergistic herbs for flavor and increased nutrient absorption.

Salads and Greens

The leaves can be consumed fresh on a salad or in recipes as well as substituted for greens like kale and collards in recipes or cooking. The antioxidant rich leaves are the most diuretic part of the plant so while they can be consumed regularly, it is important to maintain hydration too.

Important Notes:

It is important to check with a doctor before taking this or any herb, especially in large amounts or if taking any other medicine or supplement or if pregnant or nursing. Though it is generally considered safe, those allergic to ragweed, chrysanthemums, marigold, chamomile, yarrow, daisies, or iodine may not be able to consume it.

Anyone who gathers dandelion from wild sources (like the backyard) should make sure that the area has not been sprayed with pesticides or herbicides and that it does not come from an area where pets may have eliminated.

Source: http://wellnessmama.com/5680/dandelion-herb-profile/

 

 

And here’s more about how this powerhouse “weed” fights cancer……

 

A so-called “weed” growing right in your front and back yards could hold the key to being the most effective cancer-fighting compound in the world.

Previous research, as well as recent research from the University of Windsor in Canada, has found that dandelion root may be especially effective in treating and defeating cancer, and much more so than immune system-destroying chemotherapy.

As noted by the university in a press release, researchers are so sure that they have finally developed the correct dosage of the extract, that they are preparing clinical trials using a specially formulated dandelion tea.

Research director and biochemist Dr. Siyaram Pandey, Ph.D., of the University of Windsor, along with his fellow researchers, have shown successfully in the lab how the dandelion root extract causes cancer cells to go through apoptosis, or cell suicide, while leaving healthy cells intact.

“This is fantastic news,” Pandey said. “We’ve been waiting for this announcement for a long time and now it is real.”

The February 2015 announcement has special meaning for a project that was dedicated to the memory of Kevin Couvillon, who lost a three-year battle with acute myeloid leukemia in November 2010, the university said.

Destroying cancer cells within two days

The following year, his parents, Dave and Donna Couvillon, made a large contribution to Dr. Pandey’s research on natural extracts and potential cancer treatments.

“We strongly feel that Kevin would want us to continue to fight against cancer so that others would be spared such a cruel fate,” said Donna Couvillon. “Natural medicine allows one’s own immune system to be part of healing process and we wholeheartedly support this endeavour and the excellent research done by this team.”

The university press release stated further:

The dandelion root formula in use in the Pandey lab is about five times more concentrated than the extract that can be purchased over the counter and has been proven to kill leukemia, melanoma and pancreatic cancer cells in lab mice.

Caroline Hamm, an oncologist at the Windsor Regional Cancer Center, made an application to Health Canada in 2012 to proceed to human clinical trials

“This is huge, such a big. accomplishment,” says Dave Couvillon. “To see it happening is the first step and now we need to keep our fingers crossed that they get the right kind of results and we’re confident they will.”

The website Healthy Solutions reported last month that the trials found that cancer cells were destroyed within 48 hours.

From the University of Windsor’s Dandelion Root Project website:

Since the commencement of this project, we have been able to successfully assess the effect of a simple water extract of dandelion root in various human cancer cell types, in the lab and we have observed its effectiveness against human T cell leukemia, chronic myelomonocytic leukemia, pancreatic and colon cancers, with no toxicity to non-cancer cells. Furthermore, these efficacy studies have been confirmed in animal models (mice) that have been transplanted with human colon cancer cells.

Additional health benefits

Clinical trials were opened to 30 patients, all of whom had already exhausted all other cancer treatment options.

As we have reported, dandelions have other health benefits as well:

The dandelion greens contain extremely important vitamins and minerals such as vitamin B6, thiamine, riboflavin, vitamin C, iron, calcium, potassium, folate, magnesium and manganese. They may contribute up to 535% of the suggested daily intake of vitamin K, not to mention over 110% of the recommended daily intake of vitamin A. It is believed that some of its flavonoids such as zeaxanthin and cryptoxanthin have specific healing properties. Zeaxanthin seems to provide protection for the retina when confronted by the sun’s UV rays, while cryptoxanthin can potentially defend the body against the development of mouth and lung cancer cells.

Source: http://complete-health-and-happiness.com/clinical-trials-to-begin-dandelion-root-far-more-effective-in-fighting-cancer-cells-than-chemotherapy/l

For more on dandelion’s cancer-killing properties go here.

A short excerpt from a newsletter by Underground Health Reporter about using dandelion instead of prescription drugs for indigestion and blood cancer:

 Proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) like Nexium, Prilosec, and Prevacid do the exact opposite of what you want them to do.  They reduce stomach acid!  Long-term use of PPIs may result in mineral and nutrient depletion and cause serious illnesses, including…

  • Pneumonia
  • Bone loss
  • Hip fractures
  • Infection with Clostridium difficile, a harmful intestinal bacteria

If you or someone you love frequently suffers from heartburn or indigestion, turn away from PPIs and look to bitter herbs instead.  Bitters such as dandelion and chicory stimulate the production of stomach acid and other digestive juices.

Dandelion For Digestion

The bitter flavor of dandelion amps up saliva production, which helps neutralize stomach acid.  Dandelion is also anti-inflammatory, meaning it can further soothe heartburn.  Herbalists also recommend dandelion as a treatment for arthritis, gout, diabetes, cancer, and liver issues.

You can eat the greens raw in a salad, cook the greens and/or the root, blend them in your green smoothie… you can even make a coffee substitute.  When using as a tincture, take 10-20 drops of dandelion extract at the start of a meal.

The common garden weed Taraxacum officinale is public enemy #1 to homeowners who want a nice lawn …

But instead of spraying these bright yellow flowers with herbicides when they first pop up in spring, you may be better served by pulling them out by the root and eating them.

While most folks spray or pull these yard invaders, a select, savvy few eat dandelion leaves in salads and stir fries, fry the flowers and eat them as snacks, and even enjoy dandelion wine and tea.

In fact, the reason we even have these flowers in American lawns is because Europeans brought them over to use their leaves as salad greens!

They’re also rich in antioxidants, which reduce inflammation and pacify raging free radicals for better overall health.

In modern medicine, dandelion flowers and leaves have been shown to protect skin from damage caused by the sun’s UVB radiation.

These leaf and flower extracts also stimulate glutathione, an important antioxidant used in cell generation.

Dandelion root is most commonly taken as a tea, which you can make yourself by drying and food-processing the root.

New Research on Dandelions and blood cancer underway…..

Most recently, the University of Windsor received approval to continue in a game-changing Phase One human trial … one that could change how mainstream medicine views alternative and complementary cancer treatments forever.

Very soon, 30 people with end-stage blood cancers such as leukemia and lymphoma, who have had no success with conventional treatments, will help the world discover whether a super-potent dandelion tea has the power to save lives.

The dandelion root tea is formulated by Calgary-based natural health products company AOR Inc.

AOR spent about 18 months creating this potent therapeutic tea. The end product is a milled, extracted and freeze-dried dandelion root the color of mustard.

It is six to ten times more powerful than what’s available at a health food or drug store – or in your backyard. The AOR creation is not intended to be used as a supplement or like ordinary tea, but is being tested specifically for its ability to induce apoptosis in cancer cells.4

Health Canada approved the partnership between the University of Windsor and AOR in 2013, and trials are beginning in the next few months, according to our information.

The goal of Phase One trials, being the first of four, are to test the treatment in a small group for the first time to evaluate its safety, determine a safe dosage range and to identify any and all side effects.

It will most likely be another year to 18 months before the results are in.

If it works, the researchers will move onto Phase Two trials.

Even though it’ll be a while before a dandelion root-based cancer treatment is available in the marketplace, it’s very exciting that these natural remedies are being taken seriously as medical treatments.

And you don’t have to wait to start enjoying your own gourmet dandelion creations … and take advantage of their health-boosting properties.

If you or someone you know is undergoing cancer treatments, it could be worth trying dandelion tea to relieve symptoms of nausea and to aid in eliminating toxins and waste from your body.

If you’re interested in trying it, do check with your doctor (hopefully one who supports natural treatments). Dandelion root is powerful and you want to avoid any unexpected interactions or side effects.

It’s so easy to make your own tea: just clean the roots and dry them out for a few days. You can process them in a blender and put them into empty teabags, or just steep the roots in water.

You can also purchase high quality dandelion root tea from your favorite health store or retailer. Some farmer’s markets sell dandelions as well.

Source: Cancer Defeated newsletter by Lee Euler, Editor

If you’re interested in making your own dandelion tea, here is a great recipe from Natural News Blogs, and here’s some good information about when and how to harvest dandelions that also includes a recipe for making a soup with them. 

p. s. A friend just told me that dandelion is not only good for your body, it is good for the earth as well. The root system drills through compacted soil, opening channels for rain, aeration, and earthworms; the deep roots bring calcium. I also meant to mention that bees like dandelions and they are an important food source for them, especially at certain times of the year. So having dandelions around is definitely a win-win-win situation!

Ever used dandelion? Please share about your experience in the comment section.

 

Salud!

p.s. Be sure to subscribe to Self-help Health so you don’t miss any future posts. Also check out my website’s To Your Health page and Evolution Made Easier blog for more helpful health tips, tools and information.

Disclaimer: Please note that any information here is provided as a guideline only, and is not meant to substitute for the advice of your physician, nutritionist, trained healthcare practitioner, and/or inner guidance system. Always consult a professional before undertaking any change to your normal health routine.

 

The Cancer-protective Power Of Aspirin! Who Knew?!

 

Wow, I found this information very interesting. I was already aware of how low-dosage aspirin is often prescribed to ward off the possibility of heart attacks and stroke, but had not heard about this aspect/benefit of taking it.  I would be inclined to use white willow bark myself, since I usually prefer the more natural way of addressing health issues, but to each his own. Just be aware that both forms of salicin come with contra-indications, so be sure it’s something your body wants and needs (use kinesiology or muscle testing to find out and/or check with your healthcare practitioner).
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FYI, I read where most white willow bark supplements have a recommended dosage of around 800 mg per day, but according to the University of Maryland Medical Center, 240 mg is sufficient to relieve headache pain. And, if researchers are right, this simple supplement should do wonders when it comes to keeping your inflammation levels down and chronic diseases at bay, plus help protect against certain cancers.
Aspirin

The cancer-protective power of aspirin

Yes, young people and middle-aged people get cancer. But if you live decades of your life cancer-free, the older you get, the higher your risk becomes, especially after 65.

Particularly gastrointestinal cancers, like colorectal, gastric, esophageal, liver and pancreatic cancer.

Does that mean you shouldn’t follow all the emerging advice on nutrition, exercise, diets and supplements to keep your body cancer free? It does not.

But when you make it into your senior years — because you did all of those other things — there’s one more thing you can do to reduce your risk of these cancers by almost 50 percent… and chances are your doctor may have already prescribed it…

A low-dose aspirin a day

Millions of seniors take a daily aspirin to ward off risk of heart attack and stroke. If you’re one of them, you have a head start on many of us…

That’s because studies over the last 20 years have brought to light that a daily aspirin may keep certain cancers away.

But the most compelling argument for aspirin’s cancer protection came from a 10 year study led by Professor Kelvin Tsoi from the Chinese University of Hong Kong.

Professor Tsoi and his colleagues examined 618,884 participants with an average age of 67 years old, of whom 206,295 were daily aspirin users.

The aspirin users had been prescribed the drug for an average of 7.7 years, and the median dose prescribed was 80 milligrams.

According to the researchers, “Long-term use of aspirin showed 24 percent to 47 percent significant reduction on major cancers in the [gastrointestinal] tract.”

Specifically, those who took the aspirin daily were 47 percent less likely to have liver and esophageal cancer, 38 percent less likely to have stomach cancer, 34 percent less likely to have pancreatic cancer — and the risk of colorectal cancer among aspirin users was also lowered by 24 percent.

The powers that be felt so strongly about these results, in addition to the multitude of previous studies, that the U.S. Preventative Services Task Force (USPSTF), an influential federal advisory panel on disease prevention, “recommends initiating low-dose aspirin use for the primary prevention of [colorectal cancer] in adults aged 50 to 59 […] willing to take low-dose aspirin daily for at least 10 years.”

How does aspirin protect against these cancers?

Before the USPSTF makes the recommendation for a daily aspirin to the broader population, the researchers want a few questions answered starting with what is it about aspirin that may reduce these gastrointestinal cancers.

Could it have something to do with aspirin’s humble natural origins? If they find it does, I bet you won’t hear much about it, so let me fill you in…

You may have read a post by my colleague Jenny Smiechowski, titled, An herbal aspirin a day keeps disease at bay.

A precursor to the aspirin you know of today, available on any drugstore shelf, the leaves and bark of the white willow tree — known as herbal aspirin — were used to relieve pain and other health issues for almost 2,500 years.

The active ingredient in this centuries old medicinal remedy is salicin, which is naturally converted to salicylic acid in your body.

In a previous study, researchers from the Gladstone Institutes found that salicylic acid suppresses two key proteins in the body, p300 and CREB-binding protein (CBP). These two proteins control other proteins, including those responsible for inflammation and cell growth. Researchers found that by suppressing these proteins, salicylic acid prevents inflammation from damaging your cells — often a precursor to cancer. The researchers also found that the two proteins that were suppressed regulate another important protein—one related to leukemia.

And in another earlier study conducted by researchers at the University Of Miami Miller School Of Medicine, researchers found that a drug called diflunisal, which contains salicylic acid, stopped cancer from spreading and shrunk tumors in mice with leukemia.

Today’s aspirin

Now, the aspirin you find today on drugstore shelves is made of acetylsalicylic acid — a synthetic form of salicylic acid that is easily manufactured and doesn’t have to wait to be converted in your body, like the salicin found in the willow tree bark and leaves.

But, fortunately, like the ages-old version, it appears to be a potential ally in the fight against cancer.

If you’re not already taking a low-dose daily aspirin for your heart health, perhaps as a recommendation by your doctor, or for other reasons, just be sure you don’t have any health issue that would preclude you from doing so.

Aspirin can have its draw backs, including stomach bleeding and isn’t recommended if you have conditions such as active liver disease, a tendency to bleed, suffer from ulcers or bleeding in your digestive track and, of course, an allergy to aspirin. Young people under the age of 20 are advised not to take aspirin because of the threat of Reye’s syndrome, a condition that can result in death. All of this holds true for white willow bark supplements as well.

If you want to see if you’re a good candidate for a low-dose daily aspirin, run it by your doctor. Mainstream medicine relies on such medicines, so surprisingly this is one preventative measure that he probably won’t balk at.

Source: https://easyhealthoptions.com/cancer-protective-power-aspirin/

Looking for some great healthy/healing gift ideas for the holiday season? Then check out my website’s special holiday gifts page; there’s even some free gifts for YOU!

 

Salud!

p.s. Be sure to subscribe to Self-help Health so you don’t miss any future posts, and tell your friends to do the same. Also check out my website’s To Your Health page and Evolution Made Easier blog for more helpful health tips, tools and information.

Disclaimer: Please note that any information here is provided as a guideline only, and is not meant to substitute for the advice of your physician, nutritionist, trained healthcare practitioner, and/or inner guidance system. Always consult a professional before undertaking any change to your normal health routine.