New Season of Free YWR Series AND Bonus 963 Hz Download

 

Just a quick post to let you know about a new season of the free series You Wealth Revolution, where you’ll be introduced to a wide variety of presenters on alternative health, energy medicine and personal transformation. Sign up and receive a bonus of a download featuring 963 Hz solfeggio tones to help de-stress your life and bring in more joy.

 

Each day you’ll get to experience one of  40+ top teachers, healers, and scientists who will share never before tools and processes including how to:

– Let go of stress, discomfort and worry

Discover how to break-free of negative energy including, 5G, EMF, negative influences, geomagnetic stress and more…

– Experience more happiness and love no matter what’s happening around you

-Discover the ‘real truth’ about what’s happening on Earth, activate your DNA, and much more…

You can sign up here and also receive a link to your free 963 Hz download. And stay tuned for my upcoming post on Prime Mover, one of my favorite Jin Shin Jyutsu self-help tools!

 

Salud!

p.s. Be sure to subscribe to Self-help Health so you don’t miss any future posts, and tell your friends to do the same. Also check out my website’s To Your Health page and Evolution Made Easier blog for more helpful health tips, tools and information. 

Disclaimer: Please note that any information here is provided as a guideline only, and is not meant to substitute for the advice of your physician, nutritionist, trained health care practitioner, and/or inner guidance system. Always consult a professional before undertaking any change to your normal health routine.

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Great Acupressure Resource For Colds, Flu, Sore Throat And MORE!

 

Here’s lots of good self-help information to have on hand from Michael Reed Gach, PhD for using acupressure points for a cold, flu, sore throat and MORE….

 

We’re well into the winter season when it is vital to protect yourself from the wind, cold and dampness. Boosting your immune system with Acupressure and keeping your energy flowing is an effective way to ward off many winter ills.

What you eat is also vital for staying healthy.  Eating too many sweets and cold foods can make your body receptive to catching colds and sore throats.

Tip for Colds & Sore Throats: A tea made from fresh Ginger Root (available in produce markets, not the candy) can provide your body with the warmth to counteract colds and sore throats.  Chop a small handful of ginger root and simmer it for 20 minutes or so.  Use this ginger water to gargle with to relieve a sore throat.  Sweeten with a little honey to drink as a medicinal tea for colds.

When a cold comes on your shoulders may ache. This is when Acupressure shoulder points, just above the tip of your shoulder blades can help. Firm pressure on TW 15 (shown below) is great for immune boosting, stress reduction, and can help to prevent a cold.

When you feel a cold brewing, place tennis balls on the points shown above.  Apply pressure with the weight of your body, whether you’re sitting or lying down.  Placing the balls on a soft pillow or on top of your bed can be helpful.

Breathe deeply as these points are pressed for 2 minutes or so. Let yourself deeply relax with your eyes closed for at least 5 minutes immediately afterward to gain the full benefits, and allow your body’s energy to balance.

Here’s more from Michael on using Acupressure for relieving not only colds, flu and a sore throat, but also headaches, neck pain, arthritis, mental stress and a number of other things….

Acupressure Points for
Colds and Flu
Side view of anatomical chart     Colds are caused by viruses that thrive in your nose and throat when the temperature, acidity, and moisture suit them. When you are run down and your resistance is low, your ability to adapt to environmental changes weakens, making it easier to catch a cold, and the mucous membranes become a perfect breeding ground for viruses. Cold symptoms are the body’s attempt to protect itself from these intruders. When a virus enters your nose, for instance, the body secretes more mucus to flush it away.

Because acupressure stimulates your body to expel the virus more quickly, it may seem at first that your cold is worsening. But your body is simply progressing through the symptoms faster than usual. Although acupressure cannot cure a cold, working on certain points can help you get better quicker and increase your resistance to future colds.

Acupressure Points
for Seasonal Changes

Potent point B 36, called Bearing Support, is especially good for stimulating the body’s natural resistance to colds and flu. It’s located near the spine, off the tips of the shoulder blades. According to traditional Chinese medicine, wind and cold enter the pores of the skin at this point.1 The muscles in this upper back area tend to get tense just before a cold or flu takes hold.2

Recently, one of my best friends, a realtor, was suffering from a bad cold with a stuffy nose, a hacking cough, puffiness around his eyes, and a pallid complexion. He hadn’t slept well the previous two nights because of these discomforts and was very tired. After I briefly massaged his upper back, shoulders, neck, and chest, I showed him how to press the decongestion points underneath the base of his skull and on his face. I also told him to drink ginger tea at least twice a day. When I saw John the next day, he told me he had slept soundly and felt much more refreshed. His eyes looked much clearer, and already he was no longer coughing and blowing his nose.

Potent Points for Relieving Colds and Flu 

Drilling Bamboo (B 2)

Location: In the indentations of the eye sockets, on either side of where the bridge of the nose meets the ridge of the eyebrows.

Benefits: Relieves colds, sinus congestion, frontal headaches, and tired eyes.

Facial Beauty (St 3)

Location: At the bottom of the cheekbone, directly below the pupil.

Benefits: Relieves stuffy nose, head congestion, burning eyes, eye fatigue, and eye pressure.

Welcoming Perfume (LI 20)

Location: On either cheek, just outside each nostril.

Benefits: Relieves nasal congestion, sinus pain, facial paralysis, and facial swelling.

Crooked Pond (LI 11)

Location: At the outer end of the elbow crease.

Benefits: Relieves cold symptoms, fever, constipation, and elbow pain; strengthens the immune system.

Joining the Valley (Hoku) (LI 4)

Caution: This point is forbidden for pregnant women because its stimulation can cause premature contractions in the uterus.

Location: At the highest spot of the muscle on the back of the hand that protrudes when the thumb and index finger are close together.

Benefits: Relieves colds, flu, head congestion, constipation, and headaches.

Gates of Consciousness (GB 20)

Location: Below the base of the skull, in the hollows on both sides, two to three inches apart depending on the size of the head.

Benefits: Relieves headaches, head congestion, arthritis, neck pain, and irritability.

Wind Mansion (GV 16)

Location: In the center of the back of the head, in the large hollow under the base of the skull.

Benefits: Relieves head congestion, red eyes, mental stress, headaches, and stiff neck.

Third Eye Point (GV 24.5)

Location: Directly between the eyebrows, in the indentation where the bridge of the nose meets the center of your forehead.

Benefits: Relieves head congestion, stuffy nose, and headaches. 

Elegant Mansion (K 27)

Location: In the hollow below the collarbone next to the breastbone.

Benefits: Relieves chest congestion, breathing difficulties, coughing, and sore throats.

Potent Point Exercises 

You do not have to use all of these points. Using just one or two of them whenever you have a free hand can be effective.

Lie down on your back or sit comfortably.

Step 1

Press into B 2: Use your thumbs on the upper ridge of your eye socket to press into the slight hollow near the bridge of your nose for one minute. Close your eyes and take a few deep breaths, letting the weight of your head relax forward onto your thumbs.

Step 2

Press St 3 and LI 20: Place both of your middle fingers beside your nostrils and your index fingers next to them; gradually press up and underneath the cheekbones for one minute. You can easily teach this step to your child to help relieve nasal congestion.

Step 3

Press both LI 11: Bend your arm and place your thumb at the- end of the elbow crease on the outside of your forearm. Curve your fingers to press firmly into the elbow joint for one minute. Repeat on your opposite arm.

Step 4

Press LI 4 firmly: Spread your left thumb and index finger apart. Place your right thumb in the webbing on the back of your left hand and your fingertips on the palm directly behind your thumb. Firmly squeeze your thumb and index finger of your right hand together to press into the webbing. Angle the pressure toward the bone that connects with your left index finger, and hold for one minute. Then switch hands.

Step 5

Firmly press GB 20: Now close your eyes and place your thumbs underneath the base of your skull, two to three inches apart. Slowly tilt your head back and apply pressure gradually, holding the position for one minute to fully release these important cold-relief points.

Step 6

Firmly press GV 16: Place the tips of your middle fingers into the hollow in the center of the base of your skull. Keeping your fingers on the point, inhale as you tilt your head back and exhale as you relax your head forward. Continue to slowly rock your head back and forward, and breathe deeply while you hold this important point for relieving head congestion.

Step 7

Touch the GV 24.5: Bring your palms together and use your middle and index fingers to lightly touch the Third Eye Point located between your eyebrows. Breathe deeply as you hold this point for balancing your endocrine system.

Step 8

Firmly press K 27: Place your fingertips on the protrusions of your collarbone, then slide your fingers down and outward into the first indentation in between the bones. Press into this hollow as you breathe deeply and visualize the congestion clearing.

Potent Points for Relieving Coughing

A severe, repeated, or uncontrolled cough can be harmful and you should always consult a physician. Many illnesses such as influenza, pneumonia, and chronic bronchitis can become serious if the condition continues unattended. 

Sometimes, your physician will find it advisable to attempt to suppress a cough to prevent further irritation of the bronchial tubes. Cough medications may be used, but acupressure can be an effective adjunct therapy. During a coughing fit, many of the large muscle groups in the upper back area can go into a spasm. Specific points on the chest, throat, neck, and upper back benefit the respiratory system, relax your body, and relieve coughs.

 

Vital Diaphragm (B 38)

Location: Between the shoulder blade and the spine at the level of the heart.

Benefits: Relieves coughing, breathing difficulties, and respiratory problems. This calming point also helps balance the emotions.

Ding Chuan (Extra Point 17)

Location: To the side and a little above the vertebra that protrudes at the top of the spine when the head is tilted downward.

Benefits: Relieves throat problems, coughing, shoulder and neck pain, and thyroid imbalances.

Heavenly Pillar (13 10)

Location: One-half inch below the base of the skull on the ropy muscles one-half inch out from either side of the spine.

Benefits: Relieves sore throat, stress, burnout, overexertion, and heaviness in the head.

Heaven Rushing Out (CV 22)

Location: At the base of the throat in the large hollow directly below the Adam’s apple.

Benefits: Relieves dry cough, bronchitis, sore throat, chest congestion, and heartburn.

Elegant Mansion (K 27)

Location: In the hollow below the collarbone next to the breastbone.

Benefits: Relieves chest congestion, breathing difficulties, asthma, coughing, and anxiety. 

(You do not have to use all of these points. Using just one or two of them whenever you have a cough can be effective.)

Potent Point Exercises

Although many of the following points can be held while you are sitting, it is preferable to lie down comfortably on your back.

Step 1

Hold both K 27 points: Place your fingertips on your chest and firmly press into the indentations directly below the protrusions of the collarbone. This is another point that you can easily teach a child.

Step 2

Use tennis balls on B 38: Place two small rubber balls or tennis balls together on a clean carpet. Lie down, placing the balls between your shoulder blades at the level of your heart. Close your eyes and take three long, deep breaths as you continue to press the K 27 points on your upper chest. 

Step 3

Firmly press extra point 17: Slowly roll the tennis balls a few inches higher toward the base of your neck. If the tennis balls tend to slip, or you aren’t using them, Simply use both middle fingers to press this important acupressure point at the base of the neck.

Step 4

Hold both B 10 points and CV 22: Press B 10 on the upper neck with one hand, using the fingertips. Use your other hand to lightly hold CV 22, an inch below the base of the Adam’s apple, pressing lightly at a downward angle. Close your eyes and breathe deeply as you visualize healing energy soothing your throat.

For Sore Throats and Coughing 

A small piece of fresh ginger can be one of the most natural and effective ways for soothing a sore throat. Simply place a very thin slice of fresh ginger on the back of your tongue. If your throat is sensitive and the ginger feels hot, use a smaller, thinner piece and place it farther back toward your throat. Keep the ginger in the back of your throat for ten minutes. Repeat with a fresh piece several times a day as needed. A quarter cup of chopped ginger can also be simmered in a few cups of water and used as a tea for soothing coughs and sore throats. 

Source: https://acupressure.com/articles/colds_and_flu.htm

Check out Michael’s acupressure.com site for free articles and videos and information about his on-line trainings .

Also search the Self-help Health archives for more posts on preventing and treating colds, sinus congestion, sore throats and the flu.

 

Salud!

p.s. Be sure to subscribe to Self-help Health so you don’t miss any future posts, and tell your friends to do the same. Also check out my website’s To Your Health page and Evolution Made Easier blog for more helpful health tips, tools and information.

Disclaimer: Please note that any information here is provided as a guideline only, and is not meant to substitute for the advice of your physician, nutritionist, trained health care practitioner, and/or inner guidance system. Always consult a professional before undertaking any change to your normal health routine.

 

Two Minute Breath Exercise To Relax & Alleviate Pain + 21-Day Yoga Challenge

 

As someone who for years has been a shallow breather and doing the opposite of what’s recommended, i. e. I’ve been “chest breathing” and pulling my stomach in when inhaling and out when exhaling, I’m determined to be more mindful of doing things correctly. Practicing this routine and a couple of others I’ve come across is already helping proper breathing feel more natural and automatic. 🙂 And I just signed up for Wanderlust’s free 21-day yoga challenge mentioned at the end of this post that will include focusing on the breath, so that should help as well! 

 

This Two Minute Exercise Reduces Pain and Promotes Relaxation

Did you know that over 25 million adults suffer daily with pain? Are you one of them? It could be joint pain, muscle pain, headaches, pain from arthritis, fibromyalgia or nerve pain, to name a few. We are a nation full of pain sufferers, and relief for many is found in the form of over-the-counter and prescription pain medicine.

Dangers of painkillers

Many types of chronic pain are inflammatory in nature. To combat this, some people use anti-inflammatory medications (NSAIDS), both prescription and over the counter, to relieve it. While these drugs do not possess the addictive nature of opioids, they do carry some potentially dangerous risks.

In the case of all NSAID drugs, the most common side effect is gastrointestinal tract damage. According to Dr. Byron Cryer of the American Gastroenterological Association, over half of all bleeding ulcer instances can be traced back to NSAID use. Other side effects of NSAIDs include severe allergic reactions, kidney damage, and high blood pressure.

Many people who experience chronic pain are prescribed opioid painkillers by doctors. These are a popular option because this class of drug is very potent, and may temporarily eradicate many types of pain. However, these drugs come with a substantial cost in the form of some extremely nasty concerns and side effects.

The primary reason one may want to avoid opioids is their high potential for addiction. Opioid addiction is an epidemic in our nation. The Senate Caucus on International Narcotics Control reported that approximately 2.1 million people in the United States alone abused prescription opioid drugs in 2012.

Opioids also carry a high risk of overdose. The CDC reports that in 2010, just under 17,000 Americans died from opioid overdoses. That’s more deaths than from heroin and cocaine put together.

Aside from the frightening risks of addiction and overdose, opioid drugs are accompanied by a lot of potential side effects. One includes slow, shallow breathing, which can lead to death in the case of overdose. Other side effects include irregular heart rhythms, drowsiness, sleep disorders, digestive issues, lowered sex drive, osteoporosis (when taken long term) and tooth decay. It can even cause hyperalgesia, an instance where taking opioids leads to more pain, not less.

Do you have six minutes a day to spare?

I hope that your answer to this question is an inequitable, yes! If you can manage to carve out just 2 minutes each morning, midday and evening, you may well be on your way to pain relief, and relaxation like you have never experienced before.

This is something most people don’t do well

Breathing sustains life, breathing correctly revitalizes and can improve the quality of life while minimizing pain and maximizing relaxation. Most people don’t take the time to think about breathing; it is just one of those things that happen, all on its own. While this is true – taking the time to breathe correctly, even for six short minutes each day, can make a world of difference to your health.

Belly breathing or “diaphragmatic breathing,” is the ancient practice of breathing in which we can actually control our mind and body. According to the London Pain Clinic, diaphragmatic breathing is known as the act of breathing deeply into the lungs by flexing the diaphragm, not the rib cage which results in shallow breathing. As noted in the name belly breathing, when you breathe deeply there is an expansion of the stomach, not the chest.

Even taking the time to breathe deeply for six minutes each day can make a tremendous difference in your health.

Here are just five reasons why we should all belly breathe daily.

Belly breathing alleviates pain

Do you notice that your pain increases when you are under stress? Belly breathing is the perfect answer to reducing the stress in your life that may be causing pain flare-ups. Deep breathing alters your psychological state and makes pain diminish in intensity. Did you know that your brain is capable of making its own morphinelike pain relievers that are called endorphins and enkephalins? These hormones promote happy and positive feelings that can transmit messages to “stop the pain” through the body. Breathing deeply also oxygenates the blood, triggers the release of endorphins and decreases stress hormones which slow the heart rate.

Belly breathing improves respiration

If you have ever watched an infant or a dog or cat breathe, you would notice something interesting. There is a tremendous amount of 3-dimensional expansive movements around the body – especially the abdomen. As we age, we become less likely to breathe expansively or efficiently. We grow stressed, wear tight-fitting clothing and live a lifestyle that pushes breathing to the bottom of the priority list because it “just happens.”

Our cells suffer when we breathe shallowly. They are not able to get the nutrients they need, and this can cause things like fatigue, brain fog, and even longterm illness and chronic pain.

On the other hand, deep breathing profits the entire body because of improved respiration and nutrient uptake.

Belly breathing promotes relaxation

When we are living in a hurried state, like most of us are, we are often in what is known as a “fight or flight” mode. In this gear, we are engaging the sympathetic nervous system.

The only way we can access the autonomic nervous system is through deep breathing. This automatically increases the efficiency of our heart and digestion.

When we choose the relaxation response over the stress response, we can keep anxiety at bay which reduces our risk of stress-related illnesses such as heart disease, depression, digestive disorders and more.

Belly breathing improves posture

Belly breathing encourages you to sit tall. This allows all of your organ systems to work efficiently. Food is easier to digest, your heart works more efficiently, your nerves and blood vessels are less likely to be pinched. This releases hormones that help you feel more confident, causing you to sit even taller.

Belly breathing stretches and strengthens core muscles

Core muscles include the abdominals, erector back muscles, diaphragm, and the pelvic floor. When we breathe from our belly, the three-dimensional movement keeps these core muscles in good shape.

How to belly breathe

The best way to begin proper breathing is to lie on your back. Take slow, relaxed breaths that fill your entire lungs and expand your belly. Place your hands on your belly to feel the rise and fall. When you can do this easily lying down, try it standing up, it is a lot more difficult! As you progress, a great exercise to strengthen the diaphragm muscle is panting with your tongue stuck out like a dog. Seriously, the rapid motion engages the diaphragm for a quick 10-second breath workout!
To make proper breathing a daily habit, take slow, relaxed breaths for 2–5 minutes several times a day.

Breathing correctly benefits your health in surprising ways. You not only feel more relaxed, but you will have better nutrient absorption, lower blood pressure, and feel more energized. You may even drop a few excess pounds since your body requires a considerable amount of excess oxygen to dispose of fat. With all the benefits of breathing properly, it’s time to make the practice a priority and get started today.

And here’s the intro video to the Wanderlust 21-Day Yoga Challenge I mentioned with a link to where you can sign up below…… 

 

Salud!

p.s. Be sure to subscribe to Self-help Health so you don’t miss any future posts, and tell your friends to do the same. Also check out my website’s To Your Health page and Evolution Made Easier blog for more helpful health tips, tools and information.

Disclaimer: Please note that any information here is provided as a guideline only, and is not meant to substitute for the advice of your physician, nutritionist, trained health care practitioner, and/or inner guidance system. Always consult a professional before undertaking any change to your normal health routine.

Fascinating Info About Yoga And Stress, Plus Free Yoga Routines

 

I always feel better after doing some yoga, although, unfortunately, I don’t practice very often and I’m not really good at it (hmmm, maybe the two are related :-)). Fascinating to learn in this article about one of the mechanisms behind why yoga is good for us, and from now on I will definitely try to at least fit some forward and backward bends/poses in on a more regular basis. 

 

What does bending your body into yoga poses do to your brain chemistry and nerve connections?

The Science Behind Yoga and Stress

What does bending your body into yoga poses do to your brain chemistry and nerve connections?

There are two functional parts of the brain that play a key role in stress. These serve the functions of emotion and cognitive function. So I am calling them the ’emotional’ brain (amygdala and its connections and medial forebrain structures including the medial prefrontal cortex) and the ‘logical’ brain (the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex, other parts of the prefrontal cortex, parts of the cingulate cortex and parts of the hippocampus).

The emotional brain is able to initiate a ‘stress response’ via the sympathetic nervous system which culminates in adrenaline and cortisol racing through our circulation.The logical brain is always trying to ‘turn-off’ this stress response and it is also trying to restrain the emotional brain. The stronger our logical brain, the better it becomes at doing these two things. When the stress response is ‘turned off’, our parasympathetic nervous system signal is ‘turned on’. This signal ‘relaxes’ the body. So a strong logical brain goes hand in hand with relaxation.

The stress response and ‘relaxing’ signals travel through the body along a particular route and parts of this route have little ‘switches’ which we can physically manipulate to turn the signals on or off. The neck is an example of where such switches are located (by the carotid arteries).

Everytime we are holding a posture our logical brain is being activated“Every time we are holding a posture our logical brain is being activated”

Training the stress circuit

Yoga is training this entire stress circuit at two levels. First, every time we are ‘holding’ a posture, staying very still to concentrate or trying to balance, our logical brain is being activated. When we are bending forwards, our ‘relaxation’ signal is being turned on through the ‘switches’ in the neck. So bending forwards and concentrating at the same time is triggering both the logical brain and the relaxation signal at the same time.

Bending backwards triggers the stress response signal through the switches in our neck. Contracting a muscle also triggers the stress response signal. So, when we bend backwards and contract our muscles while still having to stay still and concentrate on balancing, our logical brain is given an extra challenge. It has to overcome the stress response signal being triggered in these two ways before we can be still and concentrate during a posture. This ‘extra’ resistance the logical brain is having to work against, ‘trains’ it like a muscle.

New circuitry that enables you to find it easier to control your thoughts is formed“New circuitry that enables you to find it easier to control your thoughts is formed”

Rewiring the nerve connections

At the end of a series of yoga postures, the logical brain has had a ‘workout’. It is buzzing with activity. You feel mentally calm as it is keeping your emotional brain quiet. Training the logical brain in this way for a long time can result in a rewiring of the nerve connections within the logical brain. New circuitry that enables you to find it easier to control your thoughts is formed. You may find it easier to channel your thoughts in the direction you want and not ‘dwell’ on negative thoughts or experiences. This is partly why yoga seems to have a positive effect on depression and anxiety, where sufferers have a tendency to dwell on negative life events. Stronger connections within the logical brain keeps the lid down on the emotional brain and the stress response. This is why yoga can be so effective at battling stress.

The key thing to do is to attempt yoga postures which are structured in a well-formulated sequence where each posture involves a long hold. Then your yoga and stress will begin to be balanced.

By: Dr M Storoni, MD PhD 

Source: https://upliftconnect.com/yoga-and-stress/

And speaking of yoga and stress, this seems like a great free resource. It’s a post by Nutritious Life that features 5 yoga routines that build strength and reduce stress. There’s a 30 minute routine, but also there are four 10 minute routines that focus on specific areas of the body. Something for everyone, even if you don’t have much time to spend! 🙂

https://nutritiouslife.com/sweat-often/5-yoga-routines-build-strength-reduce-stress-30-minutes-or-less/

Related Self-help Health posts:

9 Yoga Poses + 10 Minutes = Better Sleep

Boost Your Brain Power With This Superbrain Yoga Exercise

Salud!

p.s. Be sure to subscribe to Self-help Health so you don’t miss any future posts, and tell your friends to do the same. Also check out my website’s To Your Health page and Evolution Made Easier blog for more helpful health tips, tools and information.

Disclaimer: Please note that any information here is provided as a guideline only, and is not meant to substitute for the advice of your physician, nutritionist, trained health care practitioner, and/or inner guidance system. Always consult a professional before undertaking any change to your normal health routine.

The Music/Alzheimer’s Connection & More

 

I’ve featured a number of posts about the benefits of various forms of music, including a track that’s been proven to reduce anxiety and stress by up to 65%. And I’ve seen reports and videos of how reintroducing music into the lives of Alzheimer’s patients, especially if it has some connection with an earlier part of the person’s life, has brought about some amazing transformations. This article from a Brain Health Breakthroughs newsletter by Lee Euler says the same thing, plus brings out a couple of other very interesting points about the effect music can have on the foods we choose to eat, how competitive we are at playing games and more…..

 

UCLA study: Reverse memory loss associated with Alzheimer’s through diet and lifestyle changes!

This Simple Therapy Might Slow Alzheimer’s

(by Lee Euler) Researchers at the University of Utah think they may have found a way that might – just might – slow the progress of Alzheimer’s disease – no drugs, foods or supplements required.

The non-invasive technique they’re studying stimulates parts of the brain that Alzheimer’s doesn’t touch. And the Utah scientists think that it could be useful for supporting brain areas linked to memory and mood that can still be revived.

The therapy they’re analyzing? Music. From what they’ve learned so far, it also helps people with Alzheimer’s feel more grounded and connected to reality. Here’s how to put it to work for yourself or someone you love. . .

Using Music to Physically Change the Brain

You may have heard that many long-term care facilities play music to their Alzheimer’s patients, and find it has a soothing effect. In many cases, music helps family members and staff communicate with patients whose memories are very nearly gone.

In the Utah study, researchers used brain imaging to show that, when Alzheimer’s patients listen to familiar music, it activates parts of the brain called the executive network and the salience network as well as the cerebellar and cortico-cerebellar network. At the same time, these brain regions displayed what the scientists call “higher functional connectivity.”

In other words, after weeks of listening to music, many of the neurons in the brains of Alzheimer’s victims formed stronger networks capable of exchanging nerve impulses.1

“This is objective evidence from brain imaging that shows personally meaningful music is an alternative route for communicating with patients who have Alzheimer’s disease,” says researcher Normal Foster who directs the Center for Alzheimer’s care at the University of Utah.

“Language and visual memory pathways are damaged early as the disease progresses, but personalized music programs can activate the brain, especially for patients who are losing contact with their environment.”

Now the researchers admit they need to further study these effects. They don’t really know if the benefits can be prolonged or if they’re only temporary. The improved connections among neurons may not last.

My guess is they don’t last, but that’s okay. It’s an easy therapy to continue. And from what is well-known about the brain’s “use it or lose it” character, we shouldn’t be surprised that benefits fade.

Helps Healthy People, Too

Aside from this research on Alzheimer’s patients, other investigations have shown how particular types of music can have an effect on our daily activities.

For example, a study in India shows that listening to meditative music – what the researchers call “yoga music” – at bedtime has important health benefits for the heart, reduces anxiety and helps bring on sleep.2

In this test, the yoga music increased what is called heart rate variability – a measure of how well the heart adapts to the body’s needs. Generally speaking, the greater your heart rate variability, the better your heart health.

Music also boasts many other benefits:

Enhances creativity: Research in the Netherlands shows that listening to happy music – defined by the researchers as classical music that is uplifting – helps people solve problems in more creative ways. This study found that listeners to this type of music enjoy more flexibility in their thinking that allows them to come up with innovative solutions that are “outside the box.”3

Influences what you eat: You should beware the music played at a restaurant. While soft, soothing music can be conducive to making healthy choices from the menu, a study at the University of South Florida shows that louder, raucous music can make you lean more toward junk food.4

You may have noticed that no matter what activity you take part in nowadays, it’s likely to be accompanied by music. Every retail outlet you go into has piped-in music. Sporting events are often bathed in sound. Even my doctor’s office has soft music playing in the waiting room.

So it’s a safe bet that all of these musical environments have been designed to try to make you spend more money or, in the case of the doctor’s office, keep you calm.

Oh, and one more bit of advice. If you’re a Dad and your family has a game night at home, don’t let the kids play rock music while you compete. A study in Australia shows that rock music distracts men – but not women – and makes them commit more mistakes while playing board games.5

References:

1 https://healthcare.utah.edu/publicaffairs/news/2018/04/alzheimer.php

2 https://esc365.escardio.org/Congress/ESC-Congress-2018/Poster-Session-5-Cardiovascular-rehabilitation/178793-evaluation-of-heart-rate-variability-and-cardiac-autonomic-control-on-exposure-to-indian-music-and-slow-music-yoga-asana-before-sleep-at-night

3 https://journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0182210

4 http://news.usf.edu/article/templates/?a=8421&z=220

5 https://www.mja.com.au/journal/2016/205/11/razors-edge-australian-rock-music-impairs-mens-performance-when-pretending-be

And here’s a short news clip about a music program that’s been introduced to Alzheimer’s patients….

Related Self Help Health posts:

More Encouraging News About Treating Alzheimer’s Naturally

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Salud!

p.s. Be sure to subscribe to Self-help Health so you don’t miss any future posts, and tell your friends to do the same. Also check out my website’s To Your Health page and Evolution Made Easier blog for more helpful health tips, tools and information.

Disclaimer: Please note that any information here is provided as a guideline only, and is not meant to substitute for the advice of your physician, nutritionist, trained health care practitioner, and/or inner guidance system. Always consult a professional before undertaking any change to your normal health routine.

Altruism, Cancer Survival, Better Health And The Vagus Nerve Connection

 

FYI, I read Lynne’s The Power of 8 book a number of months ago, attended her Become A Better Healer course, and shortly after that became a member of a Power of 8 group. Love how this article of hers just adds more “fuel to the fire” of how altruism and intending for others is one of the best things people can do for their OWN health…….

When doing for others saves your life

(by Lynne Mctaggart) Lately, I’ve been investigating the healing power of acts of compassion on the person doing the giving, and the profound effect it can have on your immune system.

This effect all has to do with the function of the vagus nerve, one of the longest of the body, which originates at the top of the spinal cord and works its way through the heart, the lungs, the muscles of the face, the liver, and the digestive organs.

Dacher Keltner, a psychologist at University of California at Berkeley, says that the vagus nerve has three functions: to connect with all the communication systems involved with caretaking; to slow down your heart rate, calming the effects of any fight-or-flight autonomic nervous system activity, the body’s response to stress of any sort; and to initiate the release of oxytocin, a neuropeptide that plays a role in love, trust, intimacy, and devotion.

The vagus nerve also connects the brain to every organ involved in digestion and it’s a central communicator between the brain and body.

Dacher Kelter has found that this key nerve gets activated whenever we engage in our higher emotions: altruism, kindness and compassion. He’s also shown that activation of the vagus nerve helps to nurture universal love in a person and a greater acceptance of differences between the self and the other.

If oxytocin is the “love hormone,” as it is generally referred to, the vagus nerve, maintains Keltner, is the love nerve.

But when it’s activated, as when we show compassion or gratitude, it’s also the healing nerve.

Perhaps the most compelling evidence of this was produced by researchers at Vrije University in Brussels, who reviewed 12 studies involving 1,822 cancer patients. They’d monitored ​heart rate variability (HRV), which is an indicator both of the health of the heart and of vagus nerve activity.

What they found was extraordinary. The higher the vagus nerve activity, the slower the cancer progressed in these patients, no matter what type of cancer they had.

This was particularly evident with patients suffering from advanced cancer that had spread.

In biological terms, activating the vagus nerve and increasing levels of oxytocin has a marked healing effect on the body.

David Hamilton, the former medical researcher and author of Why Kindness Is Good for You, made a study of the healing effects of increased oxytocin levels and found evidence that high levels of the hormone lower inflammation and boost the immune system, aid digestion, lower blood pressure, heal wounds faster, and even repair damage to the heart after a heart attack.

Oxytocin plays a key role in turning undifferentiated stem cells into mature cells, which also help in repair and renewal.

This would partly explain why a healthy vagus nerve has such a profound effect on cancer survival.

And we’ve discovered repeatedly in my Power of Eight and Intention Experiments that people experience instant healings of every variety—including from cancer—when they get off of themselves and send intention to the other.

It’s clear that altruism brings out all the loftier emotions in us; it might be the emotion that most defines our humanity—our sense of a life well lived—and gives our life a sense of meaning.

But clearly, it’s more than a feel-good exercise. The powerfully transformational mechanisms at work in my healing intention groups may be the unique power of group prayer coupled with a deliberate focus away from the self.

In seeing yourself in the other, in joining together as one, other people, it turns out—particularly a small group of them praying with you—could be your salvation, even from cancer.

Related Self-help Health posts :
And you may be interested in this……
Monday, October 29th at 10 am Pacific/ 11 am Mountain/ 12 noon Central/ 1 pm Eastern/ 5 pm UK Time/ 6 pm Europe.
(Please note that daylight saving times end on Oct 28 in the UK and Europe, but not in the US.)
Among the fascinating and mind-expanding topics they’ll be discussing:
– How instant healing in the body might happen
– Why Darwin was wrong about ‘survival of the fittest’ and the implications for healing and thriving
– The role of the Field – and fields generated by the body – in self-healing
– The rare DNA fusion that occurred in humans, setting us apart from other primates, which enables us to self-regulate healing
– The extraordinary amplifying healing effect of small and large cooperative groups
– The power of altruism and heart-centered activities to heal the giver and end competition and polarization
They’ll also be sharing with you some of our latest research in the field and what it means for our capacity to heal each other.
This 60-minute webinar is free and will be run simultaneously on both Gregg’s and Lynne’s Facebook page. To watch, simply tune in on one of the pages on Monday, October 29th at 10 am Pacific/ 11 am Mountain/ 12 noon Central/ 1 pm Eastern/ 5 pm UK Time/ 6 pm Europe.

p. s. Lynne is also going to be interviewing Dr Bruce Lipton,  Reconnective Healing creator Eric Pearl, and Dr Joe Dispenza in future presentations. Nothing to sign up for; you just go to her Facebook page at the appropriate time or follow her page.

 

Salud!

p.s. Be sure to subscribe to Self-help Health so you don’t miss any future posts, and tell your friends to do the same. Also check out my website’s To Your Health page and Evolution Made Easier blog for more helpful health tips, tools and information.

Disclaimer: Please note that any information here is provided as a guideline only, and is not meant to substitute for the advice of your physician, nutritionist, trained healthcare practitioner, and/or inner guidance system. Always consult a professional before undertaking any change to your normal health routine.

Curb Your Entire Risk Of Cancer……With 3 Simple Words!

 

I know I’ve done several posts about gratitude before, but can you ever be reminded too often of how effective it can be in creating health and well-being?! Here’s an article by Lee Euler about how three simple words are powerful enough to curb your entire cancer risk…..

(By Lee Euler) Anxiety, stress, and depression are at an all-time high right now – especially in America. In its most recent annual survey of stress in Americans (2017), the American Psychological Association found a statistically significant increase in stress levels in the U.S. over what was reported the year before.

Some of the reasons were political, some had to do with the uncertainty that comes with modern living.

I’m sure you know stress isn’t good for us. It has profound effects at the physiological level. As your adrenal glands release the stress hormones, adrenaline and cortisol, you sweat more, your pupils get bigger, and your heart rate increases.

But the problem potentially can get much worse than dilated pupils and a faster heartbeat. . .

If the stress response becomes chronic – meaning that basically it never stops, as opposed to being a brief response to a short-term problem – then it changes your immune cells, leading to long-term inflammation.

That puts you on a slippery slope, because inflammation often causes chronic pain like arthritis or autoimmune conditions such as inflammatory bowel disease. Besides that, a growing body of evidence links inflammation to a higher risk of heart disease, depression, and a variety of cancers.

Yet incredibly, there’s a simple phrase you can say on a daily basis that might keep all these problems at bay…

Where psychology and biology intersect

If you’re curious how chronic stress can have such a profound effect on your immune system, the answer is pretty simple, as shown by a consortium of researchers across the U.S. who participated in a study recently published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.

It turns out that chronic stress alters the gene activity of your immune cells. And this happens before they even enter the bloodstream. That means your immune cells are armed and ready to fight infection or trauma before they even find any infection or trauma to fight.

The change takes place in your bone marrow, where a stress-induced modification selects for an immune cell that will be pro-inflammatory. This means that stressful experiences affect gene expression in your immune system.

And that means working for a rotten boss, or facing debt, or engaging in a feud with someone affects you on the most profound cellular level.

These cellular changes lead to the unpleasant symptoms so much of our population knows too well – fatigue, depression, trouble sleeping, and shorter tempers. Experts have long blamed genetics and environment for these issues, and those things certainly play a role. But increasing research shows that low-grade inflammation affects all these symptoms, across ethnic groups, income brackets, education levels, and geographic boundaries.

Doctor says three words help keep “inflammation emotions” at bay

Yet even as the research points to more problems raining down on us as a result of our rising inflammation levels, increasing amounts of research also point to holistic treatments as the best way to handle it all.

If you prefer a more scientific explanation, think of it this way: Any time your cortisol and adrenaline levels spike, inflammation increases all over your body. This affects your emotions, prompting what Dr. Deepak Chopra calls the “inflammation emotions” – fear, anxiety, anger, and hostility.

But — here’s the flipside. It’s a proven fact that positive emotions lower inflammation. Dr. Chopra himself published a study that tracked patients with chronic heart failure who were asked to write something in a gratitude journal every night.

The inflammation markers in the blood of those patients went down, and their health improved to a significant degree. In fact, writing in a gratitude journal had a greater positive effect than any drug.

Some might argue it’s like walking a tightrope… because the bigger your problems are, the harder it becomes to do something positive such as expressing gratitude – especially when your health is on the decline and your emotions are spiraling downward.

Yet gratitude could be the easiest and quickest way to get you back on a path toward good health. True, there are many other holistic steps you can take to lower inflammation, including working on building good relationships with friends and family so you experience positive emotions — empathy, joy, and a sense of calm — more often. Meditation also works wonders. Getting fresh air outdoors helps a great deal.

But simply expressing gratitude is probably the easiest of any of these. Really, expressing gratitude is as easy as saying the three words “I’m grateful for…” and then filling in the blank as you go about your day.

How to start your gratitude practice

The big takeaway here is not complicated: finding and appreciating the good things in your life will help you feel better. And when you feel better, you make better choices. You can handle more. You want to do more, like take a walk or try a new recipe or do any of the countless other things that keep your body healthy and cancer-free.

Here are some tips on starting your gratitude practice:

  • Commit to writing a few lines every morning or evening in a gratitude journal. List at least one thing you’re thankful for, and why. You can use a blank journal or get one of the many guided journals available online (just Google the phrase “guided gratitude journal”).
  • Be specific. One of the reasons gratitude journaling works is that it changes the way you look at your entire life. So, yes, you can write the same list of things every day – but don’t stop there! Look for new things to be grateful about and write down why you’re grateful. For example, “I’m grateful my sister invited me over to dinner on a day I was running behind and didn’t have time to cook.” Or, “I’m grateful I got a phone call from a friend I haven’t talked to in a while.”
  • Write in your gratitude journal when you feel calm and focused. If you’re always exhausted just before bed, it might be better to switch your practice to right after you wake up.
  • Focus some of your gratitude on people you’re thankful for instead of just material items or personal situations. You’ll find it can improve your relationships with them – particularly if you go a step beyond and tell them you’re grateful for them.
  • Writing out your gratitude statements by hand is reportedly the most effective way to benefit from this practice, but if you’re always on the go you might try a gratitude app like *Mojo or Day One.

A gratitude journal is not a magic cure-all for everything that ails you. It’s one thing among many we all need to do. But if you want to reverse the symptoms… lower inflammation levels and halt the progression of diseases like cancer… and avoid getting stuck on the path of no return, gratitude is the first – and easiest – step you can take.

Do I keep a gratitude journal? No, I offer prayers of thanks every night before I go to bed, and I take that occasion to thank God for all the good things in my life – the ones that are always there AND the new ones that happened that day. It’s a pretty lengthy part of my prayers, because when you start doing this it turns out there’s an enormous amount of good things – most of them things you don’t really give much thought to.

Written journal or prayers of thanks – the practice reminds you and requires you to focus on the positives in your life. And, frankly, this isn’t “natural” and few of us do it without prodding. You will find it wreaks a marvelous transformation in your life. — Lee Euler

Source: https://www.cancerdefeated.com/these-three-words-are-powerful-enough-to-curb-your-entire-cancer-risk/7028/

* There are numerous on-line groups that focus on posting what you’re grateful for…..here’s one of them….https://www.facebook.com/groups/1715465898721698/

Related Self-help Health posts: Gratitude & The DNA Connection, Get Healthier With Gratitude

 

Salud!

p.s. Be sure to subscribe to Self-help Health so you don’t miss any future posts, and tell your friends to do the same. Also check out my website’s To Your Health page and Evolution Made Easier blog for more helpful health tips, tools and information.

Disclaimer: Please note that any information here is provided as a guideline only, and is not meant to substitute for the advice of your physician, nutritionist, trained healthcare practitioner, and/or inner guidance system. Always consult a professional before undertaking any change to your normal health routine.